Fix what is still fixable, before it is too late

Ms. Clark, if I may suggest, instead of taking advice from the “business community” you should listen to the “people of B.C.

Dear Ms. Clark, if you are transparent and an honest person, you would come clean on the record of mismanagement of the shape we are in—in B.C.

Since the Liberals took the reins, I ask how many schools have closed their doors? How many hospital beds, and emergency rooms have disappeared?

Ever since I have lived in Princeton, which is at the end of the most horrible un-looked after piece of highway in B.C., the powers that be have chosen to close 24/7 ER services and thereby forcing us to use the 911 system for our accident victims while the closest centralized hospital is in Penticton.

As it is some of our babies are born on the side of the Highway. While you sit on your “throne” in Victoria, some of our accident victims are dying on the way to either Penticton or Chilliwack for lack of services.

In my mind you can stop telling me what a wonderful job your government is providing for our economy, and how many jobs you created for us when over 4600 forestry workers are off work and your “Chinese Mining Concerns” are ahead of qualified “B.C. Miners” to get hired.

Well, Ms. Clark your effort to train 1,000,000 skilled workers in a few years, sounds like another promise bound to fail with some kind of screw up. The health care is a good example of how not to fix anything without a solid plan, as the haphazard efforts have proven without a doubt.

The liberals have proven themselves to be very inefficient and scandal prone from the very start.

Ms. Clark, if I may suggest, instead of taking advice from the “business community” you should listen to the “people of B.C.,” after all they are the ones who voted all the politicians into office.

Last but not least, “The Canada does not start here, but British Columbia could be Super Natural again”. So, speak to yourself, and shake the cobwebs from your head, fix what is still fixable before it is too late.

Yukon Eric Holopainen, Princeton, BC