‘You’re sitting on a jewel, Revelstoke’: Wilderness society proposes new park

Amber Peters is a biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. She gave a presentation this week at the Community Centre in Revelstoke on the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness as part of CRED (Columbia Region Ecological Discussions) Talks, a series addressing a diversity of science topics. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)
Peters said there is the risk of disturbance from visitation if the area becomes a park, but said that might be a worthwhile cost for protection. “Stand with me as a voice for these ancient ecosystems.” (Submitted)
The area is also rich in fungi, said Peters, as a biologist found more than 100 different species in only five hours of searching. “He was completely overwhelmed.” (Submitted)
The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness. (Submitted)
The area has no roads. (Submitted)
Only 17 per cent of inland temperate rain forest is currently protected and most of that does not include valley bottoms, which can harbour higher rates of biodiversity. (Submitted)
Some trees said Peters are more than three metres wide and up to 2,000 years old. (Submitted)
Peters said preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species, including a lichen that is new to B.C. (Submitted)
(Submitted)
“We have waited 20 years to find this,” said Anne Sherrod, member of the Valhalla Wilderness Society. (Submitted)
Biologist Wayne McCrory said the discovery of Western Toads and Pacific Chorus Frog suggests the area is a locally important breeding area for both species. (Submitted)
The Rainbow Valley (Submitted)
(Submitted)
“It’s an unknown wilderness area,” said Amber Peters, biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness encompasses Frisby Creek and the Rainbow Valley on the west side of Lake Revelstoke. (Submitted)
Preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species. (Submitted)
There were thought to be only three major intact biodiversity hot spots of ancient inland rain forest remaining: Robson Valley, Quesnel Lake Wilderness and another in the Selkirk mountains. (Submitted)

A non-profit society is proposing a new provincial park north of Revelstoke.

The 8,408 hectare Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness encompasses significant tracts of ancient inland rain forest.

“It’s an unknown wilderness area,” said Amber Peters, biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. Peters gave a talk earlier this month at the Community Centre in Revelstoke about the proposal.

Peters said there were thought to be only three major intact biodiversity hot spots of ancient inland rain forest remaining in B.C., including the Robson Valley, Quesnel Lake Wilderness and another in the Selkirk mountains.

Amber Peters is a biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. She gave a presentation this week at the Community Centre in Revelstoke on the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness as part of CRED (Columbia Region Ecological Discussions) Talks, a series addressing a diversity of science topics. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

In 2017, the society was alerted to another north of Revelstoke, which included Frisby Creek and the Rainbow Valley on the west side of Lake Revelstoke.

They launched an expedition in 2018 and Peters said they found “an incredibly biodiverse ecosystem,” with trees more than three metres wide and up to 2,000 years old.

“We have waited 20 years to find this,” said Anne Sherrod, member of the Valhalla Wilderness Society.

“You’re sitting on a jewel, Revelstoke.”

Peters said the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness harbours some of the richest inland temperate rain forest found in the province, making the unroaded and unlogged wilderness a valuable refuge for wildlife and plants.

According to Parks Canada, B.C. has one of the world’s only temperate inland rain forest, all of which is found in the Columbia Mountains. The forest is notoriously wet, owing its moisture to weather systems that come from the Pacific Ocean and rise over the Columbia Mountains. They are similar in composition and structure to coastal rain forests, which are predominantly old growth.

READ MORE: Saving toads: researcher says we have to act quickly

The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness. (Submitted)

Only 17 per cent of inland temperate rain forest is currently protected and most of that does not include valley bottoms, which is important habitat.

Peters said preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species, including a lichen that is new to B.C. More than 20 rare species were also found, but in large colonies, such as smokers lung lichen.

Peters said lichen is important as they are indicators of an ecosystem’s health.

The area is also rich in fungi. A biologist found more than 100 different species after only five hours of searching.

“He was completely overwhelmed,” said Peters.

The society submitted the proposal to the provincial government last spring, along with two others, including the Quesnel Lake Wilderness and the Selkirk Mountain Caribou Park Proposal, which is a 156,461-hectare area on the south end of Glacier National Park.

READ MORE: ‘Every forest tells a story’: CRED Talks return to Revelstoke

The government did not respond in time to Black Press on the statuses of each proposal.

“We are not seeing any movement on the creation of new major protected areas,” said Peters.

“This is a crisis. We have lost almost all of our ancient ecosystems.”

While the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness area does not have logging cuts, surrounding areas do.

The lichen Methuselah’s beard is abundant in the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness, however Peters said the species is usually found in coastal rainforest and has only been found in two locations inland. (Submitted)

Peters said the area is at risk for future industrial development as BC Timber Sales does have a forest tenure in the region. According to the society, roughly 25 per cent of the proposed park is currently designated by the province for no-logging due to mountain caribou.

The Frisby-Boulder mountain caribou herd borders the proposed park. The provincial government estimates their numbers at 11 animals and said the herd is at high risk of extinction.

READ MORE: Revelstoke Snowmobile Club writes letters requesting consultation on caribou closures

If the area becomes a park, there is the risk of disturbance from visitation, said Peters, but it might be a worthwhile cost for protection.

“Stand with me as a voice for these ancient ecosystems.”


 

@pointypeak701
liam.harrap@revelstokereview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Summerland once had Old English theme

Design guidelines were introduced in late 1980s

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Crews repair damaged lakefront walkway in Summerland

Flooding in 2017 and 2018 took toll on popular walking path

COVID-19 ‘not a death sentence’ says Penticton woman after seeing senior mother recover

Cancer, blindness, a fractured hip, dementia, and COVID-19 not enough to bring Betty Jukes down

After living with horrible pain for nearly a year, Coalmont woman anticipates surgery

A Coalmont woman is waiting anxiously for the phone to ring. Nienke… Continue reading

LIVE: Procession to honour Snowbirds Capt. Jennifer Casey comes to Halifax

Snowbirds service member died in a crash in Kamloops one week ago

RCMP facing ‘systemic sustainability challenges’ due to provincial policing role

Provinces, territories and municipalities pay anywhere from 70 to 90 per cent of the cost of the RCMP’s services

One man dead after standoff with Chilliwack RCMP

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the RCMP’s role in the death

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Vancouver Foundation grants benefit Okanagan-Shuswap residents

Grants of up to $500 available for ideas that connect people socially or involve sharing skills

Ex-BC Greens leader Andrew Weaver says province came close to early election

Disagreement centred on the LNG Canada project in northern B.C.

Water quality advisory rescinded for Central Okanagan system

Turbidity levels improve enough to rescind advisory issued for Killiney Beach system May 11

Canada’s NHL teams offer options to season-ticket holders

Canadian teams are offering refunds, but also are pushing a number of incentives to let them keep the money

UPDATE: Two sent to hospital following Okanagan highway accident

Drivers in head-on collision air-lifted to hospital with serious but non-life-threatening injuries

Most Read