A group of Tulameen residents stands beside a canoe they use to get around flooded houses.

A group of Tulameen residents stands beside a canoe they use to get around flooded houses.

Tulameen lake continues to recede, possibility of another flood

Otter Lake is now a foot and a half above normal, down from six feet above normal the week before.

Water levels in Tulameen have dropped since the beginning of this week.

Otter Lake is now a foot and a half above normal, down from six feet above normal the week before.

But the situation could get worse if the weather warms up. Next week is expected to be dry with a high off 22 C.

“If it gets fairly warm then water will run back into the lake and this could raise it up,” said Dale Kronebusch, emergency services supervisor for the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen.

Otter Lake’s water level depends on how much snow is melted in the nearby mountains, he said.

And the water could move in faster because the ground is already wet from the previous flood, he added.

Water surrounding Tulameen houses was noticeably lower yesterday. The water receded from houses further away from the lake, but basements were still under water.

The rain yesterday didn’t appear to affect the water level, but it could take longer for the affect to be noticed, Kronebusch said.

He expects Tulameen to be busy this weekend with vacation property owners checking in on their houses.

Seasonal residents should check-in at the fire hall for information on how to clean their houses. Red Cross cleaning kits are available.

“Once we get through this heat spell, and we’re confident it won’t flood again, we’ll take off the evacuation alert,”┬áKronebusch said.

Otter Lake rose more than three feet in two days, causing an evacuation alert to be issued on April 26.