Interior Health says members of the public should protect themselves as local skies fill with smoke from wildfires. —Capital News file

Smoky skies means stay inside, according to Interior Health

The air quality in the Okanagan is considered a high risk

Wildfires across the province have resulted in smoky skies and poor air quality for many Interior Health communities. During times of poor air quality, it’s important that individuals take steps to protect their health and well being. Over the last week we have received questions from community members and local organizations about the health risks of strenuous outdoor activities.

In B.C. we use the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) to make recommendations for modifying outdoor activity and/or avoiding smoke.

Related: Flights from Kelowna International Airport affected by wildfire smoke

This index takes into consideration levels of particulate matter, NO2, SO2, and other gases that are known to negatively impact lung capacity, heart function, and blood flow to muscles and brain tissue. Smoke affects everyone differently, but those most at risk include individuals with underlying medical conditions such as asthma, COPD, heart disease, or diabetes, and infants, the elderly and pregnant women.

Related: Gottfriedsen Mountain wildfire continues to be held

The best way to protect your health when skies are smoky is to reduce your exposure and seek cleaner air. When the AQHI is moderate or higher (equal to and/or above 4), Interior Health recommends that individuals consider reducing or avoiding strenuous activities, and follow the recommendations provided on the BC Air Quality website.

If you are experiencing clinical symptoms of any kind, contact your health care provider or local walk-in clinic. If your symptoms are severe, seek emergency medical attention.

In the Central Okanagan, North Okanagan and South Okanagan the AQHI is currently 10+, ranked at a very high risk.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Princeton’s poppy campaign typically raises $10,000

The Princeton Legion’s annual poppy campaign is winding down. Earlier this month… Continue reading

Penticton Vees victorious over Wenatchee Wild 5-3

Late power play moves helped Vees win

BCTF rejects mediator’s recommendations for settlement

Negotiations between B.C. teachers and the province will continue

Kozakevich remains chair of RDOS board

Board of directors elects chair and vice-chair at inaugural meeting on Nov. 7

Gas prices fluctuate by more than 10 cents across the Okanagan

On Thursday morning, a litre of gas in the Central Okanagan was 122.9 cents

VIDEO: Hong Kong police shoot protester, man set on fire

It was the second protester shot since the demonstrations began in early June

PHOTOS: Hundreds come out to Remembrance Day ceremony in Keremeos

Ceremony began at 10:45 a.m. at Keremeos Legion Branch

Sportsnet fires Don Cherry after negative comments about immigrants

Don Cherry had said immigrants don’t wear poppies like other Canadians do

Trudeau’s new cabinet: Gender parity because it’s 2019? Or due to competence?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will soon appoint his new cabinet

Canada among three G20 countries least likely to hit emissions targets

It says Canada, South Korea and Australia are the farthest off

Conservatives’ Scheer wants Trudeau to open Parliament Nov. 25

That’s five days after Justin Trudeau is scheduled to swear in a new cabinet

Coquihalla, Okanagan Connector drivers cautioned due to freezing rain

Special weather statement in effect for highways between Hope, Merritt, Kamloops and Kelowna

Summerland council considers change to meeting schedule

Proposal calls for afternoon session and 6 p.m. evening session for regular meetings

Last remaining Centurion tank from the Korean War makes its journey ‘home’ to B.C.

Tank arrives in B.C. the day before Remembrance Day after a more than 4,500-kilometre transfer

Most Read