Black Press file photo

Black Press file photo

Proposed South Okanagan adventure park rejected at referendum

Members voted 149 to 93 not to support a land designation for the proposed 940-hectare project

A proposed adventure park on the Penticton Indian Band was vetoed as a result of a membership referendum on Dec. 18.

The family-oriented, action-adventure park needed a land designation of 940 hectares and was to include a sky chair with walking and nature trails accommodating access to zip lines, a mountain coaster, a waterpark, and a multi-level mountain bike terrain park. A release from the Penticton Indian Band (PIB) states additional attractions proposed for the park included an amphitheatre, concert stage and bullriding event centre adjacent to an RV park and tenting facility.

Related: Adventure park in early planning stages for Penticton Indian Band

“This referendum process was a success, as it was the second fastest land designation voting process in Canada,” said Chief Eneas in the news release sent out after the balloting for the referendum was completed. “I would like to express my gratitude for the unanimous support from the council to bring this to the membership to include in the decision-making process, thank the staff for the dedication and efforts for the hard work they do and to the private investors for bringing this idea forward.”

The release states Eneas and council forwarded the land designation to members with the belief that it would provide opportunities as identified in the comprehensive community plan in attracting opportunities for youth. If the super park were to be approved, the PIB stipulated that it’s commitment to providing responsible stewardship of the property.

Approximately 25 to 30 per cent of band members voted in the referendum, with 149 to 93 not in support of the land designation.

”Some expressed concerns around the size of the designation,” explained Eneas in the news release. “For many, 940 acres was a lot of land to be involved in this project, even if the potential benefit was large. We will move forward with similar engagement formats through the family systems, building upon and enhancing the process to consider a further set of land use designations in the new year.”

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.

Jordyn Thomson | Reporter
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