Princeton’s Brown Bridge will be closed for at least a week

A transport truck driver looking for a short cut attempted to cross Princeton’s historic, one-lane, wooden bridge last Friday.

The Brown Bridge will be closed for at least a week while structural repairs are completed, according to Jamie Umpleby, director of infrastructure and public works.

The bridge was inspected by an engineer Monday, and a final report on the damage is pending, he said. “Some of the beams have shifted and we are going to have to get them back in place.”

RCMP Corporal Chad Parsons said the driver of the truck was charged under the Motor Vehicle Act with disobeying a traffic control device and exceeding weight restrictions.

Parsons said there is no apparent reason for the mishap. “Mistakes happen.” The bridge is signed with warnings of a 5 ton weight restriction and a prohibition of no heavy trucks.

While it is the first time Parsons has personally responded to this kind of bridge incident, he said it’s not unheard of.

“Talking to city workers, they’ve seen it quite a few times before and with more damage than what this was.”

Last month The Spotlight reported the municipality is considering replacing the bridge, which was built in the 1930’s. It is one of the last wooden bridges still in use in the province.

Related: Experts say Princeton’s brown bridge is nearing the end of its life

At that time Councillor Doug Pateman said he acknowledges the heritage value of the bridge, and understands that many residents feel emotionally attached to it.

However, engineers have advised the structure is nearing the end of its life. The bridge was re-decked last fall, an undertaking that is necessary every four or five years.

“As it stands right now you can’t even get a fully loaded fire truck across it. They have to go up and around,” he said.

“And we are constantly repairing it. Every year we are doing something.”

Princeton councillors have requested a meeting with the minister of transportation and infrastructure to discuss options for the bridge and petition for funding.

Related: What will happen if the brown bridge is assessed?

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Priest Camp near Summerland was created in 1845

Agreement formed between Grand Chief Nicola (1793-1859) and Father Giovanni Nobili (1812-1856)

Princeton snow removal costs top $40k in December

Costs of snow removal to the Town of Princeton skyrocketed in December.… Continue reading

Province says it is monitoring AIM’s road maintenance

The provincial transportation ministry is working closely with new road contractor AIM,… Continue reading

Princeton – a Prince Town in waiting?

The Town of Princeton has been waiting 160 years for a Royal… Continue reading

RCMP release photos of man wanted in Princeton armed robbery

RCMP have released photos and a description of the man suspected of… Continue reading

Huawei exec’s extradition hearing begins in Canada

China’s foreign ministry complained the United States and Canada were violating Meng’s rights

Prince Harry: ‘Powerful media’ is why he’s stepping away

Prince Harry and Megan have stepped away from their royal commitments

How to beat Blue Monday, the most depressing day of the year

Multiple factors can play a role in seasonal depression, says Fraser Health psychiatrist

B.C. VIEWS: Few clouds on Horgan’s horizon

Horgan’s biggest challenge in the remainder of his term will be to keep the economy humming along

Kelowna’s Tess Critchlow gears up for World Cup at Big White

Critchlow is a professional snowboarder competing for Team Canada in the boardercross competition

Victoria family focuses on ‘letting go, enjoying time together’ after dad gets dementia

Walter Strauss has developed an interest in music and now takes line dancing classes

B.C. forest industry grasps for hope amid seven-month strike, shutdowns, changes

Some experts say this could be worse for forestry than the 2008 financial crisis

Most Read