Chris Roche used 20 kgs of flour and 20 lbs of margarine to make the roof and the walls. Photo Andrea DeMeer

Chris Roche used 20 kgs of flour and 20 lbs of margarine to make the roof and the walls. Photo Andrea DeMeer

Princeton baker builds giant gingerbread house

It looks good enough to eat and almost big enough to sit in.

A Princeton baker, Chris Roche, has constructed a nearly three-foot high gingerbread house and it’s wowing customers at Save On Foods.

With the exception of some hot glue to hold together the large gingerbread panels, the house is completely edible.

Materials used in the build include 20 kgs of flour, 20 lbs of margarine, seven litres of corn syrup and five kg of brown sugar.

The confection is two feet wide and four feet long.

Before the pieces were baked Roche melted hard candies and poured them into holes to create a stained glass window effect on the walls. The roof is shingled with saltine crackers covered in sugar.

It took Roche and his helpers just over a week to finish the job.

Roche trained as a baker at Vancouver Island University. He said the idea for the project came out of a discussion with other store employees and the Save On manager.

“It’s not the first time I’ve done a large gingerbread house, but I’ve never done one quite this large.”

Bakery employee Jolene Dickson, along with her daughters Jasmine and Cadance, decorated the house with icing sugar and a variety of hard candies and chocolates.