114 Canadians were appointed Nov. 27 to the Order of Canada. (Governor General of Canada photo)

114 Canadians were appointed Nov. 27 to the Order of Canada. (Governor General of Canada photo)

Indigenous actor, author, elder, leaders appointed to Order of Canada

Outstanding achievement, community dedication and service recognized

Several Indigenous Canadians have been awarded the country’s highest civilian honours in the latest round of appointments.

On Nov. 27, Gov. Gen. Julie Payette announced 114 new appointments to the Order of Canada.

Indigenous appointees include Tom Jackson and Doreen Spence of Calgary, Alta., Thomas King of Guelph, Ont., Chief Darcy Bear of Whitecap Dakota First Nation, Sask. and Harvey Andrew McCue (Waubageshig) of Ottawa, Ont.

There are three levels —Companion, Officer and Member —within the Order of Canada recognizing a lifetime of outstanding achievement and merit of the highest degrees, especially in service to Canada or humanity at large, noted the Office of the Governor-General.

Read More: Olympic champions Virtue, Moir and Tewksbury among 114 Order of Canada inductees

Jackson was born on the One Arrow Reserve near the South Saskatchewan River northeast of Saskatoon, Sask. He has led a prolific career as an actor and singer, and over the years, has supported underprivileged Canadians through his philanthropic initiatives. Previously an officer of the Order of Canada in 2000, Jackson has been promoted, companion.

King has also been promoted within the Order of Canada from officer to companion. He self-identifies as being of Cherokee and Greek ancestry and is one of North America’s most acclaimed literary figures.

Spence, a well-respected Cree elder advocating for peace and Indigenous people’s human rights, has been appointed officer.

Bear and McCue have both been appointed members.

Numerous economic and social development opportunities have resulted under Bear’s leadership as chief of the Whitecap Dakota First Nation near Saskatoon, Sask.

McCue is being recognized for his contributions to the “health and well-being of Indigenous youth in Canada and his influential leadership education.”

The Order of Canada was created in 1967.

Recipients will be invited to accept their insignia —an iconic snowflake of six points— at a future ceremony.


Do you have a comment about this story? email:
rebecca.dyok@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Order of Canada

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

People skate on a lake in a city park in Montreal, Sunday, January 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
The end of hugs: How COVID-19 has changed daily life a year after Canada’s first case

Today marks the one year anniversary of COVID-19 landing in Canada

The Okanagan Regional Library is holding a pair of online contests for its young readers. (File photo)
Okanagan Regional Library challenges young readers

Pair of contests online aimed at kids aged up to 18

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Employers might be able to require COVID-19 vaccination from employees: B.C. lawyer

‘An employer must make the case’ using expert science, explains lawyer David Mardiros

Interior Health reported 79 new cases of COVID-19 and two new death in the region Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. (Ben Hohenstatt/Juneau Empire)
79 new COVID-19 cases, two deaths reported in Interior Health

Both of Friday’s deaths were both recorded at long-term care homes

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders sits in on a COVID-19 briefing with Dr. Bonnie Henry, provincial health officer, and Adrian Dix, B.C. minister of health. (Birinder Narang/Twitter)
PHOTOS: Bernie Sanders visits B.C. landmarks through the magic of photo editing

Residents jump on viral trend of photoshopping U.S. senator into images

Auldin Maxwell stacks the 693rd block on the top of record-breaking Jenga tower on Nov. 29. (Submitted)
Salmon Arm boy rests world-record attempt on single Jenga brick

Auldin Maxwell, 12, is now officially a Guinness world record holder.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks in the in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Payette shouldn’t get same benefits as other ex-governors general: O’Toole

Former governors general are entitled to a pension and also get a regular income paid to them for the rest of their lives

Crystal Johns used her lunch break to film her audition video for the Vancouver Canucks.
VIDEO: Former Vees anthem singer wants to bring her voice to the Canucks

Crystal Johns made her audition tape during a lunch break

Snow covers Main Street in downtown Penticton Monday morning, Jan. 25, 2021.
First snowfall of 2021

Chances of light snow all week

(Phil McLachlan - Capital News file)
Two Kelowna flights flagged for COVID-19 onboard

The flights were on Jan. 14 and 18

A woman injects herself with crack cocaine at a supervised consumption site Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Drug users at greater risk of dying as services scale back in second wave of COVID-19

It pins the blame largely on a lack of supports, a corrupted drug supply

A Dodge Ram pickup similar to this one was involved in a hit-and-run in Lake Country on Saturday, Jan. 16. (Crime Stoppers photo)
Stolen truck involved in Okanagan hit-and-run

Incident happened on Highway 97 in Lake Country just before 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16

Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
‘We’re still in it’: Wet’suwet’en push forward on rights recognition

The 670-km Coastal GasLink pipeline was approved by B.C. and 20 elected First Nations councils on its path

Most Read