COLLEGE DAYS                                In 1909, Ritchie Hall, at the right in this picture, was one of two Okanagan College student residences. The house on the left was owned by Dr. James and Gertrude Angwin. They moved to Summerland in 1907 from Nova Scotia.The Angwin house can still be seen on Giant’s Head Road.                                (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

COLLEGE DAYS In 1909, Ritchie Hall, at the right in this picture, was one of two Okanagan College student residences. The house on the left was owned by Dr. James and Gertrude Angwin. They moved to Summerland in 1907 from Nova Scotia.The Angwin house can still be seen on Giant’s Head Road. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Ritchie Hall was student residence in Summerland

Building destroyed by fire in 1941

In 1909, Ritchie Hall was one of two Okanagan College student residences.

The building was destroyed by fire in 1941.

The house on the left was owned by Dr. James and Gertrude Angwin. They moved to Summerland in 1907 from Nova Scotia, because of his ill health and also probably because he was friends with some of the professors at the college.

READ ALSO: Bank has been part of Summerland’s history

READ ALSO: Summerland once had college campus

The Angwin house can still be seen on Giant’s Head Road.

Okanagan Baptist College began in the fall of 1906. The first classes were taught by Rev. G. Campbell in the Empire Hall building, with two students enrolled.

Construction on Ritchie Hall began in the spring of 1907. It was completed that fall.

Ritchie Hall was later used to house high school students. Later the building was used by a religious group as a home for the friendless.

Another college building, Morton House, was constructed in 1910. It was used for high school classes from 1920 to 1922 and later became a hotel.

The building was moved to Penticton in 1988. It burned down in February, 1991.

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