Column

When taking a road trip to border towns like Osoyoos, don’t travel without your passports or turn off your car’s GPS. (Black Press Media photo)

BUSH: Road trip wrong-turn triggers bungle at the Osoyoos border

Don’t shut off your GPS if you haven’t driven through Osoyoos in 30 years, warns columnist

 

Ryan Reynolds sent reporter Jessica Peters a celebratory message on Twitter when she announced the end of her cancer journey.

VIDEO: Message from Ryan Reynolds helps Black Press reporter celebrate end of cancer journey

Reporter Jessica Peters writes how one tweet helped share happiness around the world

 

The T-33 was used in the Korean War, but is a mainstay at airshows across North America these days. My flight suit awaits. (Jessica Peters/Abbotsford News)

COLUMN: Black Press reporter straps into old fighter jet at Abbotsford Airshow

‘Used in the Korean War 70 years ago, the T-33 is one of my favourite aircraft to watch in flight’

 

A Rogers wireless store in Toronto is shown amid a countrywide outage of the telecommunication company’s services, Friday, July 8, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Shouting It Out Loud: Canada has a cartel problem

Telecomm and gas companies run legal cartels in Canada

A Rogers wireless store in Toronto is shown amid a countrywide outage of the telecommunication company’s services, Friday, July 8, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston
A health care worker is seen outside the Emergency dept. of the Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver on March 30, 2020. he B.C. government says temporary pandemic pay that was promised to essential workers in mid-May should be coming in October. The stipend was promised to hundreds of thousands of essential workers for work done between March and July and some workers say they’re frustrated it still hasn’t arrived. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

PETERS: Nurses give far more than just medical care

On National Nurses Week, it’s time to think back to the nurses who have cared for us

A health care worker is seen outside the Emergency dept. of the Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver on March 30, 2020. he B.C. government says temporary pandemic pay that was promised to essential workers in mid-May should be coming in October. The stipend was promised to hundreds of thousands of essential workers for work done between March and July and some workers say they’re frustrated it still hasn’t arrived. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
FILE: Four-year-old Jonah Arbez holds a protest sign at a Friday’s Strike for Climate on the steps of Nanaimo City Hall in 2019. (Cole Schisler/Black Press)

Cole’s Notes: It’s hard to be young these days

It won’t be easy to solve our problems, but our futures are worth fighting for

FILE: Four-year-old Jonah Arbez holds a protest sign at a Friday’s Strike for Climate on the steps of Nanaimo City Hall in 2019. (Cole Schisler/Black Press)
Robert’s column

Robert Barron column: Fond memories of ‘Paddy’s Day’

By mid afternoon, the party started really taking off

Robert’s column
The view from about halfway down Silver Star Mountain Resort’s “Far Out” green run. (Zachary Roman/Eagle Valley News)

Column: New year, same old me

The Roman Report by Zachary Roman

The view from about halfway down Silver Star Mountain Resort’s “Far Out” green run. (Zachary Roman/Eagle Valley News)
(Pixabay photo)

With eggnog only: Terrible Christmas movies you’ll want to avoid this season

North Island Gazette editor Tyson Whitney watched these ‘classics’ so you don’t have to

(Pixabay photo)
The Michaud Creek wildfire burning along Lower Arrow Lake pictured July 17. (Ashley Voykin photo)

Shouting It Out Loud: Fight wildfires by fighting climate change

Brennan Phillips is a journalist with Black Press

The Michaud Creek wildfire burning along Lower Arrow Lake pictured July 17. (Ashley Voykin photo)
A map created by the Ministry of Forests shows the activity of the Bea Fire in Beaverdell, B.C. in 1989, including one house in particular (at bottom right) that was nearly completely surrounded by flames. (Ministry of Forests)

COLUMN: Looking back on historic fire that nearly destroyed a B.C. town

Enormous firefighting effort saved Beaverdell from destruction in 1989

A map created by the Ministry of Forests shows the activity of the Bea Fire in Beaverdell, B.C. in 1989, including one house in particular (at bottom right) that was nearly completely surrounded by flames. (Ministry of Forests)
Neuroscientists say that people are 70 per cent more likely to recall your brand after seeing it in print. Other studies have shown that 82 per cent of consumers report that they trust print ads in relation to other media. ADOBE STOCK IMAGE

IT’S YOUR BUSINESS: A case for print

Print is still a highly effective medium for helping businesses reach their customers, according to Joe Smith

  • Jun 12, 2021
Neuroscientists say that people are 70 per cent more likely to recall your brand after seeing it in print. Other studies have shown that 82 per cent of consumers report that they trust print ads in relation to other media. ADOBE STOCK IMAGE
Parliament Hill is viewed below a Canada flag in Gatineau, Quebec, Friday, Sept. 18, 2020. In 2014, Parliament and the Canadian War Memorial were the sites of a terrorist attack.
(Canadian Press - Sean Kilpatrick)

Shouting it out loud: You can’t wish away addiction and mental illness

Who is John Vassilaki to say what is ‘normal’?

Parliament Hill is viewed below a Canada flag in Gatineau, Quebec, Friday, Sept. 18, 2020. In 2014, Parliament and the Canadian War Memorial were the sites of a terrorist attack.
(Canadian Press - Sean Kilpatrick)
A view of Revelstoke. (North Columbia Environmental Society)

Jocelyn’s Jottings: The housing market is changing Revelstoke

How many people do you know who have left because they can’t afford to buy a house?

A view of Revelstoke. (North Columbia Environmental Society)
Voting is the number one, bare minimum way to have your voice heard by government. (File photo)

Jocelyn’s Jottings: Want to make change? Here are some suggestions

As a citizen you have a voice, you just have to know who to talk to

Voting is the number one, bare minimum way to have your voice heard by government. (File photo)
Ekamjit Ghuman in Victoria’s Fan Tan Alley.

GUEST COLUMN: Life with cerebral palsy full of triumph and tribulations

Tuesday, Oct. 6 is World Cerebral Palsy Day

  • Oct 6, 2020
Ekamjit Ghuman in Victoria’s Fan Tan Alley.
What’s COVID-19 doing to friendships?

What’s COVID-19 doing to friendships?

Life and Faith column by Jim Taylor

  • Aug 13, 2020
What’s COVID-19 doing to friendships?
Crews prepare to film a holiday movie in Summerland on July 29, 2020 (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

COLUMN: Bringing British Columbia’s stories to the screen

The movies are often American stories, with B.C. communities serving as stand-ins for U.S. locations

Crews prepare to film a holiday movie in Summerland on July 29, 2020 (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix look on as Premier John Horgan discusses reopening the province’s economy in phases in response to the COVID-19 pandemic during a press conference in the rotunda at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday May 6, 2020. (Chad Hipolito - The Canadian Press)

Mitchell’s Musings: Leading the way through a pandemic

Columnist Glenn Mitchell sings Dr. Bonnie Henry’s praises in his latest Musings

  • Jun 25, 2020
Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix look on as Premier John Horgan discusses reopening the province’s economy in phases in response to the COVID-19 pandemic during a press conference in the rotunda at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday May 6, 2020. (Chad Hipolito - The Canadian Press)
It’s getting easier to access a swab test for COVID-19, but you still need a referral from a doctor, and a little courage. (Jessica Peters/ The Progress)

COLUMN: I sneezed, I coughed, so I got tested for COVID-19

Accessing a swab test is easy these days, but the actual test can more than a little daunting

It’s getting easier to access a swab test for COVID-19, but you still need a referral from a doctor, and a little courage. (Jessica Peters/ The Progress)