Princeton Posse — From the president

Dean Johnston, president of the Princeton Posse gives the community an update

Princeton Posse coaching team Mark McNaughton

The Posse has ridden hard for the past few weeks.

It would be remiss to indicate that the ride has not always been at gallop and a huge thank you must continually be made to all those who have previously saddled up for the cause. The most recent group may have been running on fewer horses at the end, but the desire for the same end result must never be questioned. Again, from the team and hopefully the community and all fans, a huge thank you!

After seven years of stability and marked improvement on the ice, Duner has moved on to coach the Fernie Ghostriders, also in the KIJHL. He is wished continued success and many will follow his future with interest. Unfortunately the Ghostriders do not visit Princeton this season, so any discussion of an appreciation evening will have to wait. Rumours in Princeton are certainly neither new nor rare. It is fair to say that the Posse was struggling. It is also fair to say that this played a significant role in Duner leaving. Nonetheless, less than a week after his resignation, Duner was announced on the Ghostriders’ website as the new coach thus eliminating any potential reconciliation. The organization is grateful for his many dedicated years and he is wished continued success.

Future direction

With a new board of 18 and a coaching staff already in place, the dust kicked up by this newest version of Posse riders will be hard to miss. This is hardly a half full vs half empty scenario – to a one the board sees only a full glass of opportunity to ensure that the Posse remains in Princeton long term. The coaching staff has been charged with engaging the team in the community. As with any group gaining momentum, the hope is that the community will catch the same fever as this energized group.

The coaching staff has been focusing on the team roster and announcements will follow on player signing. The board has split up the many duties and is laying down a path that will hopefully return the Princeton arena to the days when the Posse led the league in attendance.

In focusing on the Posse in Princeton rather than the Princeton Posse, the board hopes to reengage the business community, the student body, minor hockey, and just hockey fans in general. First order of business was a decision to sell one of the busses – the Posse is a hockey team period.

 

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