Writer disagrees with Mr. Walker’s opinion on health care system

Our universal health system was devised to eradicate a rich versus poor concept

Dear Editor,

Who is this Mark Walker spouting off about how beneficial a free market or two-tiered medical system similar to the U.S.A. would be for us? He insinuates that doctors in such an environment could, for services rendered, charge competitive fees to those with adequate funds and then treat the poorer citizens as a civic duty. It all sounds so logical if, in reality, they have the time, energy or inclination to look after the needs of the lower echelon after treating the elite of the population. Our universal health system was devised to eradicate a rich versus poor concept and attempt to guarantee timely health services to every class of citizen.

To quote Mr. Walker: “Most of the responsibility, however, rests with the populace (Princeton?) that holds to a childish belief that politicians will give them something for nothing…”

So now we’re childish and expect something for nothing in Mr. Walker’s view. How arrogant, misinformed, and mean spirited can that be? Canadians are highly taxed for the privilege of having health services and it is up to our politicians and the Interior Health Authority to spend OUR money wisely rather than mismanaging those precious funds. Talking about something for nothing, might I ask Mr. Walker whether the two-tier system would use, to their benefit, the hospital facilities and astronomical infrastructure that is all paid for by the Canadian taxpayer?

Medicare is overburdened and will probably continue that way for many reasons. Mark Walker isn’t in favour of rationing care to those in need, but his alternate concept (two-tier or private) could put many lower income families or individuals on a starvation diet of neglect.

If the bottom line for doctors to practice in Princeton or other small towns is a matter of higher compensation, then the Ministry of Health and IHA need to address this issue. Who in their right mind would be against top salaries for all medical staff?

No, Mark Walker, we don’t wish something for nothing. If or when you need medical attention through our universal coverage we will all be contributing to your recovery.

Monty Raine, Princeton