Response to letter “Quit complaining about the deer”

There was never a mention of my being victimized in any of my letters. I found your thoughts humorous, as did so many others that read it.

Editor’s note: This letter is a response to a letter that was published in last week’s Spotlight concerning complaints about Princeton’s urban deer population.

Dear Editor,

There was never a mention of my being victimized in any of my letters. I found your thoughts humorous, as did so many others that read it.

But you know what, responding to your letter is really an exercise in futility, because if you had absorbed and given a little thought to any letters (from others besides me) that you read over the years you might have a more sensible and realistic way of thinking.

But it’s possible that you dismissed everything as hogwash, which is very sad because the 90-year-old lady that had to fend off a deer with her walker certainly wouldn’t share you’re thinking, nor would the elderly man who was brutally attacked.

Hunting season is the deer control system?

It’s all right with you then that the deer are hunted and killed in the wild (where they belong) as long as you don’t know how many or how they were killed, but we’re supposed to pussy foot around the ones in town though because, to my knowledge, hunting deer in town is against the law.

I’m a believer in wildlife conservation and a proud supporter of Canadian Wildlife and B.C. Wildlife Federation and periodically the SPCA.

Re: tour busses – these people in all probability have never seen a deer in real life and if they had to live amongst them, they’d have a different opinion.

And in Asian countries they wouldn’t live long if they became a problem.

Twenty years ago seeing a deer in town was rare, but then people started feeding them, encouraging them to stay.

Deer repellent sprays – I purchased two types that should have worked – good money down the drain.

Deer resistant plants – now they eat anything and everything, maybe I should plant rhubarb?!

Re: dogs – these are not wild animals – they are pets that live as members of the family.

Owners are responsible for their dogs, but unfortunately some are made the way they are, because of being abused, tormented or trained to be vicious.

Enough said!!

Kay Goglin

Princeton