A vote for health

It is with some relief that the time for the vote for the pool has finally dawned, so that we can move on to other pastures. I am surprised at the amazing amount of emotion that has been attached to something that to me (as a health professional) is really quite clear cut. I have not met a single person who does not agree that the pool is a great idea, but then that word “but” comes into play with a certain percentage of people only.

Dear Editor;

It is with some relief that the time for the vote for the pool has finally dawned, so that we can move on to other pastures.  I am surprised at the amazing amount of emotion that has been attached to something that to me (as a health professional) is really quite clear cut.  I have not met a single person who does not agree that the pool is a great idea, but then that word “but” comes into play with a certain percentage of people only.

Well, in my mind, it is a great idea, without any “buts” at all.

There is no hesitation, in my mind, that the pool will have tremendous health benefits to the community.  Having lived in Hay River in the NWT for three years (where they had exactly the type of facility that is proposed here), it was, as a physician, wonderful for me to see the obvious health benefits to one and all.  The images of toddlers learning to swim when it was -40C outside, of Diabetic training sessions, of serious swimmers training in their aspirations to represent their country one day, of “seniors hour” which were “get fit classes” twice a week for seniors, for young people getting together to socialize instead of watching TV and for just the average Joe having a swim – it was all good.

The Princeton public might be interested to know that there are at the moment about 500 patients who suffer from Diabetes in this community.  The rate of Obesity is increasing at an alarming rate amongst our young people and this remains one of the biggest factors for Diabetes and heart disease later on in life.  The only recognized form of attack against these serious diseases is exercise and correct eating habits.  It is, of course, well recognized that one of the best forms of exercise in these patients is swimming.  Many Diabetics have the problem of co-morbidities (obesity and arthritis) which precludes them from having the ability to walk or go to the gym, and it is well recognized that swimming is not only the alternative, but that it’s in actual fact, the only alternative.

For this reason alone (and there are many others), I implore the people of Princeton to vote YES in the referendum.  I would assume that all Diabetics will vote YES and for them and all others I would consider a YES vote as a vote for the future health of this community.

 

 

David Smith MD.

Princeton Medical Center

Princeton, B.C.