Flags at Summerland’s municipal hall and at other public buildings in Summerland have been lowered to half mast in response to the discovery of more than 200 children found buried at a former residential school in Kamloops. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

Flags at Summerland’s municipal hall and at other public buildings in Summerland have been lowered to half mast in response to the discovery of more than 200 children found buried at a former residential school in Kamloops. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

Summerland flags at half mast following discovery at Kamloops Residential School

Bodies of more than 200 children found buried at site of former school

Flags at Summerland’s municipal buildings and parks have been lowered to half mast to honour the 215 children found buried at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops.

The discovery was confirmed on May 27 by the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation.

READ ALSO: Remains of 215 children found at former residential school in Kamloops

READ ALSO: Penticton Indian Band ‘shocked and sickened’ by discovery at Kamloops Residential School

The residential school was operated by the Catholic Church from 1890 to 1969 and was the largest residential school in Canada.

On Monday, May 31, the municipality of Summerland lowered its flags to half mast in recognition of these deaths.

“Following the discovery of the remains of 215 Missing Children on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, on behalf of the district of Summerland council and staff, I offer our deepest condolences to the members of Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc and all Indigenous communities who struggle with the lasting impacts of the residential school system,” Summerland mayor Toni Boot said in a statement.

“We are deeply saddened by the profoundly disturbing treatment these young lives endured, even in death.”

Flags at federal buildings, the B.C. Legislature and at public buildings in other communities have also been lowered to half mast in response to the deaths.

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