Princeton hosts Western Canada’s only festival devoted exclusively to traditional music

From a Doukhobor choir to folk singers, singer songwriters, Celtic music and the British Columbia Regiment Band, the Princeton Traditional Music Festival is one of the most unique festivals in B.C.

This totally free festival brings in musical talent from across North America to celebrate all things traditional music, and is the only festival in Western Canada that exclusively features traditional music. The streets of downtown Princeton, B.C. close to cars and the festival takes over the streets.

Founded by Jon Bartlett and Rika Ruebsaat, the festival is considered a testament to their life long commitment to this form of music. They are singers of traditional song and scholars of ballads, shanties, and other folk songs. The Princeton Traditional Music Festival, and its success, is a testimony to their passion and hard work.

“We have been singing songs of British Columbia for over 50 years. The songs and the history behind them is our passion. Some of the songs we sing were collected in Princeton during the last century. We decided it would be wonderful to share some of this musical culture in the place in which it was born. It was also an opportunity to invite our extended, international musical community to come to Princeton and party,” explains Jon Bartlett and Rika Ruebsaat.

“Traditional music is music that has been passed on orally from one generation to the next. It’s music that comes out of communities and is about everyday life. Examples of traditional music are sea shanties, murder ballads, logging, mining and fishing songs as well as dance

tunes on instruments such as fiddles, banjos, accordions and harmonicas.”

Bartlett and Ruebsaat said those attending the festival for the first time this year can expect to hear music that they’ve probably never heard before (songs from B.C. history, a Doukhobor choir, songs from the Republic of Georgia etc.).

“It’s a great way to spend the day meandering through picturesque downtown Princeton, hearing w onderful music, meeting other visitors and stopping for a meal or a milkshake,” adds Ruebsaat.

A loyal following have been attending the festival for years and say they keep coming back because the festival feels like a big neighbourhood party, that’s welcoming friendly and congenial where they can hear music that they can’t hear anywhere else.

Just Posted

Kelowna classroom where child allegedly overdosed re-opens after cleaning

An 8-year-old was unresponsive and unable to walk after ingesting an unknown substance at school.

Hockey groups take over Princeton arena concession

New hands will be serving up food at the Princeton Arena concession… Continue reading

EDITORIAL: This is our election

It is up to the voting public to identify the issues in the upcoming federal election

Gold scammers selling fake jewellery in Princeton B.C.

“Don’t buy jewelery at the side of the road.” That’s the advice… Continue reading

VIDEO: Vancouver Island mayor details emergency response after fatal bus crash

Sharie Minions says she is ‘appalled’ by condition of road where bus crashed

Federal party leaders address gun violence after weekend shooting near Toronto

One teen was killed and five people injured in the shooting

Video: Rain doesn’t deter Terry Fox runners in Salmon Arm

Dozens showed up to continue the Canadian icon’s marathon of hope.

Conservatives promise tax cut that they say will address Liberal increases

Scheer says the cut would apply to the lowest income bracket

B.C. VIEWS: Cutting wood waste produces some bleeding

Value-added industry slowly grows as big sawmills close

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Some say the high cost of logs is the major cause of the industry’s decline in B.C.

Federal food safety watchdog says batch of baby formula recalled

The agency says it’s conducting a food safety investigation

Road block was costly legal battle for Summerland

Resolving Garnet Valley dispute took six years

Most Read