No easy solutions for deer problem in Princeton

Brian Harris, Wildlife Biologist for the Ministry of Forests and Wildlife presented options for managing deer in town.

During the regular meeting of Council

Mr. Brian Harris, Wildlife Biologist for the Ministry of Forests and Wildlife gave a presentation to Mayor and Council during the regular meeting of Council on Dec. 2.

His presentation included an explanation of the environmental and social reasons deer occupied towns, the consequences of their doing so and gave options for management.

Conflict reductions such as hazing, repellents, landscaping alternatives were discussed as well as population control techniques like, reduction and fertility control.

Administrative options (some of which Princeton has already done) were mentioned; coordinated deer counts, public education and the amendment of municipal bylaws; banning of ungulate feeding, regulation of land use or type of landscaping and weapon use and hunting.

Councillor Pateman asked about the methods of “spooks” – the way to scare off the deer. “Do you have to keep changing methods?”

Harris replied, “Deer will get used to almost anything, it’s best to keep changing them up.”

Harris noted that he had spoken with Council in 2007 and that Princeton had done a deer count in 2009, but the level of concern with the deer dropped off. “Now it’s back,” he said.

Harris went on to describe what other municipalities had done and were doing and offered the suggestion that Council develop a management plan to further actions already in place. ie) Deer brochure and survey.

“If there was an easy solution, we’d have had it fixed long ago,” said Harris.

Mayor Armitage thanked Harris for the information presented. He then noted that Princeton had paid a ‘big price in the loss of a conservation officer for the area.’ “I hope that something objectively positive can happen,” he said.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Democracy costs Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen more than $500,000

Remuneration and expenses paid to chair, directors and alternate directors comes to $542,588

Okanagan set for thunderstorms before sunny weekend

Thunderstorms are predicted to give way to a hot, sunny weekend around Kelowna

Body of 21-year-old man found in Okanagan Lake

BC Coroners Service is investigting the circumstances of the man’s death

COLUMN: Ryga Arts Festival and the library present Extended Play

It’s not going to be the same as a live performance, but viewing from home can be magical

Wildfire burns near Okanagan Connector

All lanes are now open on Highway 97C

Airlines dispute Dr. Henry’s claim they ‘very rarely’ give accurate COVID contact tracing info

Air Canada, WestJet say they provide names and contact information

Workplace design: Are you grown up enough to work from home?

Columnist Jules Galloway is the founder/owner of Evolve Design| Build

Kelowna RCMP discover more imitation firearms used in crimes

RCMP say the fake guns can be hard to distinguish from the real ones

Dyer: Replacing dam and solar power

Research indicates Canada could replace 100% of power from dams with solar, using only 13% of the land

Airborne hot dog strikes Greater Victoria pedestrian

Police called to 4200-block of Quadra Street for hot dog incident

Kootnekoff: CEWS expanded and extended

Susan Kootnekoff is the founder of Inspire Law, her diverse legal career spans over 20 years

B.C. scientist, 63, protests in trees set to be removed for Trans Mountain pipeline

Tim Takaro is reaching new heights as he tries to stall the pipeline expansion project in New Westminster

Summerland Health Care Auxiliary provides bursaries to high school grads

Thrift shop has operated in Summerland for 61 years

Police investigate North Okanagan truck fire

‘At this time, investigators are treating the fire as suspicious,’ says Cpl. Tania Finn

Most Read