B.C. Liberal Party MLA Linda Larson from the Boundary-Similkameen riding, spoke in a committee meeting in B.C. Legislature Tuesday afternoon on the issue of health care in the Osoyoos-Oliver area. (B.C. Legislature image)

B.C. Liberal Party MLA Linda Larson from the Boundary-Similkameen riding, spoke in a committee meeting in B.C. Legislature Tuesday afternoon on the issue of health care in the Osoyoos-Oliver area. (B.C. Legislature image)

MLA Larson wants to abolish daylight saving time

Okanagan-Boundary MLA put forward private member bill

Next spring, it will be 100 years since we first had to set our clocks forward for daylight saving time. Boundary-Similkameen MLA Linda Larson thinks it is time to end it.

“It is something that is widely supported and was put on the floor at the 2017 UBCM by one of my communities, Grand Forks,” said Larson. “It was supported by the members of UBCM and the premier just kind of ignored it. He did say people could contact him and he received so many emails that he had to close down that account because it was so overwhelmed.”

Larsen introduced Bill M201 last Thursday at the end of the fall session and moved it be placed on the orders of the day for second reading at the next sitting of the House in February. She said there were claps of support from the other side of the House when she presented and that she will be reaching out to see if she can garner support from the government.

“I really do feel it has a fighting chance,” she said, adding the purpose of daylight saving time has long since gone.

MLA Thomas Dang of Edmonton South West launched a similar bill in Alberta earlier this year.

“I have reached out by email to that member that introduced it but haven’t heard back from him yet. It had failed and one of the reasons was B.C. wasn’t doing it. So let’s get it out there and get back on board,” said Larson. “Finally people’s clocks will be their clock. You won’t have distraction twice a year that causes no end of issues … there is enough documentation and studies to show what it has done to negatively affect us.”

According to the Canadian Press, public consultations in Alberta on the bill show people are divided on the issue and businesses such as WestJet said it could lead to economic losses. Although Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said there would be more debate on the issue, Dang believes if more jurisdictions brought the debate forward it could be a nationwide conversation

Larson said she hopes if her bill moves forward it would be debated on the floor of the house. She does not believe a costly referendum is needed when the public opinion can be taken through online surveys.

Jaret Blidook, a licensed practical nurse in Oliver, is fully supportive of moving the province to standard time year-round and asks that the issue receive non-partisan support.

“In my industry, I talk to shift work nurses that find it difficult for them. Even things as simple as administrating medication that people need at a certain time, people who are diabetic, or have a certain regime where we are waking them up an hour early to give their medication or an hour later, it does have an effect on them. It throws people off for days until their body can reset,” said Blidock.

He said whether you like the time change or not, what is important is to objectively look at studies about how it affects people. In Larson’s introduction of the bill, she noted studies have been published about the negative impacts including an increase in heart attacks and car accidents in the days immediately following the time shift. She noted that studies have also identified losses to the economy from lack of productivity directly related to the time shift.

Should the bill pass, changes would be required to the Interpretation Act and other consequential amendments.

Just Posted

FILE – Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, takes part in an event on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous Peoples Day must be a ‘call to action’, says Assembly of First Nations chief

Discovery of children at Kamloops residential school site must lead to change, Perry Bellegarde says

The Pierre family, an Indigenous family, once lived in what is now downtown Summerland. Today, Pierre Drive is named in honour of the family. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
Pierre family played role in Summerland’s history

Downtown Summerland was once Penticton Indian Reserve #3

This undated file photo provided by Ernie Carswell & Partners shows the home featured in the opening and closing scenes of The Brady Bunch in Los Angeles. Do you know the occupation of Mike Brady, the father in this show about a blended family? (Anthony Barcelo/Ernie Carswell & Partners via AP, File)
QUIZ: A celebration of dad on Father’s Day

How much do you know about famous fathers?

Fruit farmers in the Okanagan and Creston valleys are in desperate need of cherry harvesters amid COVID-19 work shortages. (Photo: Unsplash/Abigail Miller)
‘Desperate’ need for workers at Okanagan cherry farms

Fruit farmers are worried they’ll have to abandon crops due to COVID-19 work shortages

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Over 5K jabbed at Interior Health mobile COVID-19 vaccine clinics

The clinics have made stops in more than 40 communities since launching last week

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

Indigenous rights and climate activists gathered outside Liberty Mutual’s office in Vancouver to pressure the insurance giant to stop covering Trans Mountain. (Photo by Andrew Larigakis)
Activists work to ensure Trans Mountain won’t get insurance

Global campaign urging insurance providers to stay away from Canadian pipeline project

In the first election with public money replacing corporate or union donations, B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson, B.C. Greens leader Sonia Furstenau and B.C. NDP leader John Horgan take part in election debate at the University of B.C., Oct. 13, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
B.C. MLAs ponder 2022 ‘sunset’ of subsidy for political parties

NDP, B.C. Fed call for increase, B.C. Liberals have no comment

Investigators use a bucket to help recover human remains at a home burned in the Camp fire, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Magalia, Calif. Many of the missing in the deadly Northern California wildfire are elderly residents in Magalia, a forested town of about 11,000 north of the destroyed town of Paradise. (AP Photo/John Locher)
‘Forever War’ with fire has California battling forests instead

Five of the state’s largest-ever blazes seared California last year, as authorities tackle prevention

The Sacred Hearts church on PIB land burned Monday morning. (Theresa May Jack Facebook)
Church burns on Penticton Indian Band land

The fire started around 1:30 a.m. Monday morning

Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto and IOC President Thomas Bach, on a screen, speak during a five=party online meeting at Harumi Island Triton Square Tower Y in Tokyo Monday, June 21, 2021. The Tokyo Olympics will allow some local fans to attend when the games open in just over a month, Tokyo organizing committee officials and the IOC said on Monday. (Rodrigo Reyes Marin/Pool Photo via AP)
Tokyo Olympics to allow Japanese fans only, with strict limits

Organizers set a limit of 50% capacity — up to a maximum of 10,000 fans

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Border quarantine to soon lift for fully vaccinated Canadians

Eligible travellers must still take multiple COVID-19 tests

Most Read