Hedley man advertises bounty on rats

Hedley man advertises bounty on rats

One rat tail will net five dollars

A Hedley man has put a $5 bounty on rats in his community, and is willing to pay $5 for every rat tail he is given.

Several members of the community have complained on social media about a increase in the local rodent population.

The creative resident said he’s only bought one rat tail since he put up a sign advertising the offer, but he is hopeful more people will get out and bring down the critters.

He disposes of rat carcasses by burning them, he said.

Related: The rats have moved in

According to HealthLink BC, only three kinds of rodents create domestic or farmyard problems– the house mouse, Norway rat and black rat.

That service advises the following for getting rid of rodents:

“Rats and mice have babies often, so it is important to find and get rid of them quickly and efficiently.

“Even if you do not see an actual rodent, the size and shape of the droppings can tell you if it is a mouse or rat. It is important to know what pest you are trying to get rid of as there are different control methods for the different rodents.

“Mouse droppings are approximately 6 mm (1/4 inch) long and oval shaped. Roof rat droppings are about 13 mm (1/2 inch) long with pointed ends and Norway rat droppings are about 19mm (3/4 inch) long with blunt ends.

“The best way to get rid of rats or mice is by using traps. If using spring loaded traps for rats, bait three of them in a row without setting them. Bait with dried fruit, peanut butter mixed with oats, or cheese. Set the traps at ‘right angles’ (90 degrees) to the walls where the rodents are known to travel, with the bait side of the trap toward the wall.

When the rodents get use to feeding, set the traps. Make sure the bait is securely attached to the trip pedal so the trap springs when the food is removed.

“Once you capture a rodent, make sure not to touch it with your bare hands.

“Wear gloves when handling a dead rodent and the trap.

“Double bag the dead rat or mouse, seal the bags, and then bury, burn, or place the bags in the trash, according to local bylaws. The trap can be reset if gloves are worn.

“It is not a good idea to use poison or baits to control rodents. Poisoned rodents can crawl away and die, and their bodies can be hard to find and result in unpleasant odors.

“Poisons can also accidentally harm pets, wild animals, or even children.

“Ultrasound repellers, although effective at first, are expensive and do not have long-term success at eliminating rodents. If after taking preventive measures, a rat problem still exists on your property and you want to try rat poison, there are certain things you should consider:

• Set out non-poisoned food for a few days prior to baiting, so the rodent starts feeding in the area.

• Read and follow the directions on the label carefully.

• Set bait in areas where there is no access to children or pets.

• Remove dead rodents and all baits once pest control has been completed.

“If you are unable to control rodents on your own, contact a licensed company with certified staff to help you.”

HealthLinkBC also says homeowners should eliminate food and water supplies, hiding and living places, and pest proof their buildings.

Related: Rats rear their pointy heads around the Interior

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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