Former UBC creative writing professor Steve Galloway. (The Canadian Press)

Complainant vs UBC prof Steven Galloway wants investigator’s report

Lawyer says key paragraphs about complainant’s report of sexual harassment are blacked out

The lawyer for the main complainant against Steven Galloway says she’s pleased the fired creative writing professor won’t be returning to his post.

A labour arbitrator’s decision released Friday ordered the University of British Columbia to pay Galloway $167,000 in damages. It also showed that in February, the school’s faculty association withdrew its claim on behalf of Galloway for reinstatement to his post and for lost income and benefits.

“MC is pleased that Mr. Galloway will not be returning to his position of trust in his teaching position at UBC,” Joanna Birenbaum, who represents the main complainant referred to as MC, said in an email.

But Birenbaum said her client still wants Galloway to grant permission for the release of an unredacted copy of the initial investigation report.

“Key paragraphs on the findings of the investigator about MC’s report of sexual harassment are blacked out. In the name of fairness, MC calls on Mr. Galloway to withdraw his refusal, and to give permission to UBC to release the unredacted report,” Birenbaum said.

Galloway could not immediately be reached for comment.

READ MORE: UBC must pay fired author Steven Galloway $167,000 for privacy violation

The labour arbitration decision ordered UBC to pay Galloway for statements that violated his privacy rights and harmed his reputation, but it did not specifically say which communications infringed on Galloway’s privacy.

Galloway filed one grievance after he was suspended in November 2015, asserting that UBC erred when it sent a memo to faculty, staff and students that announced he had been suspended pending an investigation into “serious allegations.”

He filed a second grievance in June 2016 after he was fired, claiming the university’s communications about his termination, in which it said he was fired after an “irreparable breach of trust,” were misleading and caused serious damage to his reputation and ongoing suffering.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Confused about breathalyzer rules? Penticton RCMP clarify

New federal impaired driving laws spark confusion, concern about breathalyzer administration

Video: New Penticton studio is a playground for creative types

We toured Penticton’s newest creator space

Balmy winter forecast for Okanagan-Shuswap

El Niño is anticipated to develop later this winter

Dementia journey the long good-bye

More than 70,000 people in B.C. have been diagnosed with dementia

Grants for Okanagan youth initiatives available

Project funding of up to $2,000 available for the South and Central Okanagan

Giant rotating ice disk forms in Maine river

Ice disk that is roughly 100 yards wide has formed in the Presumpscot River

Daredevil changes game plan to jump broken White Rock pier

Brooke Colby tells council daredevil event would help boost waterfront business

B.C. storm totals $37M in insured damages

The December storm wreaked havoc on B.C.’s south coast

Pregnant B.C. firefighter tries to save own house that caught fire

Julia Flinton and Anthony Sellars both worked on the 2017 wildfires

Theresa May wins no-confidence vote after Brexit deal rejection

UK PM can keep her job, after House of Commons voted 325-306

First Nation supporters march to Horgan’s MLA office

Dozens marched across the Greater Victoria community of Langford to support the Wet’suwet’en people

Liberal candidate steps aside after singling out Jagmeet Singh’s race

Karen Wang says she made comments online that referenced Singh’s cultural background

Most Read