Committee working to find suitable option to resolve Princeton deer population issue

To see the summary of the 2013 Town of Princeton Deer Survey visit the Town Website at:
princeton.ca

Earlier this year, Councillor Jason Earle formed a Deer Committee with volunteers, Karin Green, Rosemary Doughty and Lisa Carleton. The committee developed and adopted a survey that was issued to Princeton residents. 1270 surveys went out and 334 were returned.

In September of this year, on behalf of the Town of Princeton, Councillor Doug Pateman gave the following Urban Deer presentation to Minister Thompson – Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

Of the 334 surveys returned, 81 percent stated that, “No action taken by Council was unacceptable.”

45.3 percent indicated to capture and euthanize was acceptable and 41.3 percent indicated that relocation was the preferred method of dealing with the deer population in Princeton.

Because of only a four percent difference, Council feels that to perform a cull would only invite court action against the municipality—something they wish to avoid.  Exploration into the possibility of “Hazing” as a method to correct the urban deer issue is underway. However, as per section 78 of the Wildlife Act, “the use of dogs to harass wildlife is an actionable offence.’ To go further, to use dogs to round up, run down or to chase deer within a town boundary causes three specific dangers.

1) Panicked deer become a traffic hazard.

2) Panicked deer will run where ever they want and through what they want, causing property damage.

3) Panicked deer become injured quite easily leading to the need for the injured animal to be put down.

These three reasons, again have the potential to lead in to legal action by animal rights activists, against the municipality.

In 2010, the BC Government conducted a study and filed a report titled, “B.C. Urban Ungulates Conflict Analysis.” Princeton, among other municipalities were mentioned as prime examples of aggressive Mule Deer interaction towards humans. In this report was a list of different tactics used by both Canada and the United States as well as their results.

In 1985, the city of Winnipeg managed to capture and relocate 283 deer. Damage complaints and deer vehicle collisions dropped dramatically for the next 10 -12 years. By the numbers shown, this example was the most favourable of results of all the examples given in the report.

This method also had the longest desired effect and most importantly, animal rights activists were appeased.

What Council proposes is a three stage program. They would like to see the conservation office take a more active role in the removal and euthanizing of identified aggressive and territorial deer.

Step two would be a relocation program implemented by the provincial government with the possibility of partial funding to municipalities who have followed pre-described steps such as deer committees, surveys and public education in order to qualify.

Step three would be an amendment of Section 78 of the Wildlife Act to allow in B.C., qualified and licensed hazing contractors to work within town boundaries in extreme cases.

This problem was created by mankind and like it or not, it must be corrected and managed by mankind.

Councillor Pateman along with committee members Doughty and Carleton are continuing efforts to find an acceptable and affordable solution to deal with the deer population in the community.

 

Just Posted

Okanagan RCMP look for owners of various keys located during arrest

RCMP seek to reunite the owners of various keys found at the arrest of suspects in a stolen vehicle.

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Take a look inside B.C.’s first and only legal pot shop located in Kamloops

BC Green already planning Princeton expansion

Company purchases ore land in industrial park

Don’t be dazed and confused about cannabis legalization

Sitting down with an Okanagan lawyer to clear the haze of marijuana rules

10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

Pot is legal – but there are still a lot of rules, and breaking some could leave you in jail

Your morning news in 90: Oct. 18, 2018

Tune in for 90 seconds to get the top headlines for the Okanagan, Shuswap and Similkameen.

VOTE: Nature in Focus reader’s choice photo contest

The Penticton Western News Reader’s Choice photo contest

Proportional representation grows government, B.C. study finds

Spending, deficits higher in countries where voting system used

Black market will thrive until small pot growers and sellers included: advocates

Advocates say the black market will continue to thrive until small retail shops and craft growers are included in the regime.

Goodbye cable, hello Netflix: 1/3 of Canadians cut the cord

Just under half of households no longer have a landline phone

‘Some baloney’ in assertion Canada’s pension fund has highest ethical standards

The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney”.

In Mexico Beach after Hurricane Michael, some coming home find no home

State emergency management officials said some 124,500 customers across the Panhandle were still without power Wednesday morning and 1,157 remained in shelters.

Man linked to Saudi prince at consulate when writer vanished

Saudi Arabia, which initially called the allegations “baseless,” has not responded to repeated requests for comment from The Associated Press over recent days.

Manhunt in Crimea for possible accomplice in school attack

An 18-year-old student, who later killed himself, was initially believed to be the only one involved

Most Read