Cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals are now legal in Canada, one year after cannabis was first legalized on Oct. 17, 2018. (Photo from Unsplash)

Cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals are now legal in Canada, one year after cannabis was first legalized on Oct. 17, 2018. (Photo from Unsplash)

Cannabis edibles, extracts legalized today in Canada

You can now legally purchase weed brownies!

Cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals are finally legal as of today, one year after the legalization of cannabis in Canada.

But just because its legal, does not mean these cannabis products will be on your local cannabis dispensary shelves just yet, since manufacturers must serve a 60-days notice to Health Canada for all new products. This means that your Christmas shopping for treats this year might get a little more interesting.

The federal government issued its regulations for edible cannabis, cannabis extracts for ingesting and inhaling and cannabis topicals back in June 2019.

According to the new rules, edible cannabis, for drinking or eating, can only contain 10 mg of THC per package and must come in plain, child-resistant packaging.

READ MORE: Second cannabis dispensary opens its doors in the Penticton region

For indigestible cannabis extracts, they are permitted to contain 10 mg of THC per unit and 1000mg of THC per package, and the maximum package size is 90 mL for liquid extracts under three per cent THC and 7.5 g for extracts over three per cent THC. The packaging must also include a dispensing device if it is liquid form.

Cannabis extracts for inhaling are also limited to 1,000 mg of THC per package and are limited to 90 mL packages if under three per cent THC and 7.5 g packaging if over three per cent THC. For both forms of cannabis extracts, topical cannabis and edible cannabis the packaging must indicate the equivalency to dried cannabis to determine public possession limit.

Indigenous Bloom, a cannabis dispensing corporation that partners with First Nations communities, has been offering the above products since opening multiple store locations on First Nations’ lands throughout the province. They were able to jump the gun ahead of the official legalization for these alternative cannabis products because they are not federally regulated.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.

Jordyn Thomson | Reporter
JordynThomson 
Send Jordyn Thomson an email.
Like the Western News on Facebook.
Follow us on Twitter.