Bizarre testimony including insults, profanity and accusations in Princeton court

Two Princeton men came to verbal blows Thursday in circuit court, employing insults, name calling and profanity during a peace bond hearing.

Accusations stacked up and ran the gamut from drug selling to violence, and even the suggestion that one man shot himself in the head to avoid being interviewed by police in connection with a long-ago homicide, and that the RCMP are involved in a conspiracy to not bring charges.

Paul Nicholas was charged with causing fear of injury in another person, Ronald Stevens.

The two have a documented history in Princeton and have previously been required through peace bond to have no contact.

The court heard that in January of this year Nicholas and Stevens fell into an altercation on Vermilion Avenue.

Stevens testified that Nicholas swore to kill him and accused him of selling Fentanyl laced drugs to his longtime partner, who died in December 2018.

“He screamed that I sold the Fentanyl to his girlfriend who [overdosed] and that I was a drug dealer and basically that he was going to kill me,” said Stevens, while being questioned by Crown Attorney Andrew Vandersluys.

Stevens admitted to the court he sold drugs to the woman twice in the past, but did not sell her drugs before she died.

“I didn’t kill your wife this time,” he said to Nicholas – who was acting as his own lawyer – under cross examination.

Nicholas later testified his partner did not die of an overdose.

When Vandersluys asked Stevens if he was fearful of Nicholas he responded: “I’m afraid he’s going to jump me at any time. But am I afraid of him as a man? No.”

Nicholas said Stevens has no cause to be afraid of him, and said that his adversary once showed up at his house with a knife.

He accused Stevens of shooting himself in the head at one point to avoid involvement in a local homicide investigation.

“He put a bullet in his own head and he says he’s afraid of me.”

Nicholas also claimed police would not recommend charges against Stevens because they are conspiring against him.

Judge Gregory Koturbash ruled that, by his own statements, Stevens indicated he was not fearful Nicholas and the charge was stayed.

Addressing Nicholas he said: “You have been put on notice that he does not want to have any contact with you….If you talk things can get misconstrued. Stay away from him.”

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Word on the Street: Festivalgoers at the 27th annual Salmon Arm Roots and Blues

The Observer asked: Where are you from and what brought you to the festival?

New Penticton/Kelowna transit route ready to roll out

Route 70 Penticton/Kelowna will provide a direct trip to Kelowna from Penticton and Summerland

The Offspring and Sum41 ready to rock Penticton

The Offspring and Sum 41 will stop in Penticton to the South Okanagan Events Centre

Motorcyclist involved in Westside Road crash

Air ambulance assists while motorists face lengthy delays

Summerland cannabis shop receives approval in principle

Inspection now required before Green Gaia may sell cannabis

VIDEO: Could we BE any more excited? ‘Friends’ fans go crazy for merch

Movie theatres will show select episodes to mark the NBC series’ 25th anniversary

Penticton man sentenced in non-fatal 2017 shooting

Elkena Michael Knauff sentenced to seven and a half months in jail

Bodies of two missing Surrey men found near Ashcroft

Ryan Provencher and Richard Scurr have been missing since July 17

Pregnant teachers fight to change WorkSafeBC compensation rules

Agency does not recognize risk to unborn babies when mother catches illness from work

Kamloops RCMP locate and arrest man who fled from police

The 22-year-old male was wanted in relation to a domestic violence investigation

Five hedgehogs quickly adopted after being left at BC SPCA

Lucky new owners picked up their pets from Maple Ridge branch on Aug. 20

EDITORIAL: The best or the least worst

Negative messaging abandons the quest for the best and instead asks voters to choose the least worst

Most Read