Efficiency Canada, a Carleton University-based advocacy organization, launched the country’s first-ever energy efficiency scorecard Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. (Pixabay photo)

Efficiency Canada, a Carleton University-based advocacy organization, launched the country’s first-ever energy efficiency scorecard Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. (Pixabay photo)

B.C. gets top marks in national energy efficiency report card

CleanBC and Energy Step Code programs boost B.C.’s score in inaugural report

B.C. has been ranked as the country’s most energy efficient region, according to a new national report which scores each province’s efforts to save energy.

Efficiency Canada, a Carleton University-based advocacy organization, launched the country’s first-ever energy efficiency scorecard Wednesday, as a way to track annual progress across the country to meet national climate change commitments.

The scorecard takes five measurements into consideration: each province’s policy progress on energy efficiency programs, enabling policies, buildings, transportation and industry.

“Imagine thinking of all that energy waste from our homes, businesses and industry as a ‘resource’, just like natural gas, oil or wind turbines,” the organizations executive director, Corey Diamond, said in a news release.

“Now imagine harvesting that ‘resource’ in every community across Canada, creating jobs and meeting our climate change commitments. At a time when much of the country is at odds on our energy future, boosting energy efficiency is surely something all Canadians can agree on.”

B.C. earned 56 points out of 100 for its efforts, including the Energy Step Code program, which gives incentives to developers to create net-zero energy buildings with a goal of making it a requirement within the province’s building code by 2032, explained Brendan Haley, the study’s lead author.

Another key policy that earned B.C. high marks was FortisBC’s increasing natural gas program savings, which rose from 0.2 to 0.5 per cent of sales this year making it the second highest target in the country.

READ MORE: New grants make energy retrofits more affordable for B.C. property owners

But the researchers said the province does have room for improvement, as well.

The report says that despite the CleanBC Plan foreseeing a need for new generation plants to meet the growing need for clean energy to power buildings and transportation, BC Hydro has ramped down program savings in recent years. Instead, “increasing electricity savings now will help manage a higher peak demand in the future and avoid the need to build expensive and risky hydro generation projects in the future,” the report reads.

Researchers also suggested that B.C. implement a mandatory building energy rating program in order to inform consumers of the true value of properties based on its energy efficiency – a commitment referred to in B.C.’s Climate Action Plan.

Quebec scored in second place, with 48 points, because of its high number of registered drivers with electric and hybrid vehicles, as well as its number of public charging stations. Quebec is the only province that has an energy savings target related to transportation fuel.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A nurse performs a test on a patient at a drive-in COVID-19 clinic in Montreal, on Wednesday, October 21, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson)
30 new COVID-19 cases, five more deaths in Interior Health

This brings the total number of cases to 7,271 since testing began

(Stock photo)
EDITORIAL: The freedom to read

Books have been challenged many times in the past

Even with COVID travel restrictions the occupancy rate at the campground shot from 17 per cent to 45 per cent in 2020.  Photo Town of Princeton
Princeton’s town-owned RV park caught ‘campfire’ in 2020

Tourism director has even bigger plans for coming year

Reactions to the federal government’s proposed gun legislation are mixed across the province. (File photo)
Princeton mayor has no appetite for local handgun ban

Newly tabled federal legislation will download decision to municipalities

FILE – A COVID-19 vaccine being prepared. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
B.C. seniors 80 years and older to get COVID vaccine details over next 2 weeks: Henry

Province is expanding vaccine workforce as officials ramp up age-based rollout

Dr. Bonnie Henry talk about the next steps in B.C.'s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
456 new COVID-19 cases in B.C., 2 deaths

Since January 2020, 78,278 have tested positive for the novel coronavirus in B.C.

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)
Vaccinating essential workers before seniors in B.C. could save lives: experts

A new study says the switch could also save up to $230 million in provincial health-care costs

The late Michael Gregory, 57, is accused of sexually exploiting six junior high students between 1999 and 2005. (Pixabay)
Former Alberta teacher accused of sexually assaulting students found dead in B.C.

Mounties say Michael Gregory’s death has been deemed ‘non-suspicious’

According to a new poll, a majority of Canadians want to see illicit drugs decriminalized. (THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Majority of Canadians think it’s high time to decriminalize illicit drugs: poll

More than two-times the B.C. residents know someone who died from an overdose compared to rest of Canada

Ranchero Deep Creek firefighters respond to a blaze involving two adjacent structures at a property off of Deep Creek Road on Sunday, Feb. 21. The buildings were believed to have been used as part of a cannabis growing operation, and RCMP are investigating. (Sean Coubrough/CSRD photo)
Ranchero Deep Creek firefighters respond to a blaze involving two adjacent structures at a property off of Deep Creek Road on Sunday, Feb. 21. The buildings were believed to have been used as part of a cannabis growing operation, and RCMP are investigating. (Sean Coubrough/CSRD photo)
Shuswap firefighters responding to structure blaze find cannabis grow operation

RCMP investigating, attempting to track down owner of property

Interior Health officially declared a COVID-19 outbreak at Creekside Landing in Vernon on Jan. 3, which was followed by the first death from the virus 10 days later. (Kaigo photo)
COVID outbreak over at Vernon care home

Creekside Landing cleared of coronavirus, despite additional death in last day

The dam at Thirsk Lake, west of Summerland, was expanded in 2007. A crack has now been discovered where the old and new portions of the dam meet. (Summerland Review file photo)
Crack at Thirsk Dam to be examined

Reservoir west of Summerland was expanded in 2007

(Black Press Media file photo)
B.C. residents can reserve provincial camp sites starting March 8

B.C. residents get priority access to camping reservations in province

Most Read