A view of Revelstoke from a helicopter. (Photo via Revelstoke Search and Rescue)

A view of Revelstoke from a helicopter. (Photo via Revelstoke Search and Rescue)

A call to search and rescue should be a last resort-Revelstoke Search and Rescue

‘We are happy to rescue you but not your stuff’

Revelstoke Search and Rescue responded to five calls in three days last week, for a total of 46 this winter.

In a Facebook post, the group cautioned that though they are happy to rescue you they don’t rescue your stuff.

“New sled with a mechanical issue? Nope. Touring gear that can’t fit in the heli basket? Nope. Gloves you’ve left on the ground after we’ve taken-off? Nope,” the post reads.

As much as possible, you should be prepared to self-rescue: know where you are going, how long it will take to get there and back and what you would do if you couldn’t get back in time.

“SAR should not be the preferred way out, it should be your last resort.”

When a Search and Rescue call goes out in Revelstoke, 100 volunteers receive it.

“We drop our forks, leave our dinner, detach from our snuggle partner watching Netflix, drop our home projects, and happily head out with the goal of bringing those needing help back to safety.”

While they don’t mind the “grey area” calls where you called early, out of precaution and everything is resolved quickly, they “aren’t thrilled” about the ones where other options to return safely clearly existed but a heli-lift was a nicer option.

“SOS on your satellite communicator does not connect you with a concierge. It connects you with rescue professionals focused solely on returning you to safety. Use it wisely.”


 

@RevelstokeRevue
editor@revelstoketimesreview.com

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