Canada & World

A Cineplex Odeon theatre is pictured in North Vancouver, on May 15, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A Cineplex Odeon theatre is pictured in North Vancouver, on May 15, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine against COVID-19 are out of their packaging to be prepared at a vaccination center of the 3rd district, in Paris, Monday, Jan. 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Francois Mori

Deliveries of COVID-19 vaccine doses to Canada set to more than quadruple next week

Deliveries of COVID-19 vaccine doses to Canada set to more than quadruple next week

Vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine against COVID-19 are out of their packaging to be prepared at a vaccination center of the 3rd district, in Paris, Monday, Jan. 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Francois Mori
The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) headquarters Connaught Building is pictured in Ottawa on Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. nbsp; THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Internal data shows surge in harassment complaints at Canada Revenue Agency, RCMP

New workplace harassment, violence-prevention regulations under Canada Labour Code came into effect Jan. 1

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) headquarters Connaught Building is pictured in Ottawa on Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. nbsp; THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
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Netflix co-CEO and chief content officer Ted Sarandos poses in this undated handout photo. Netflix plans to open an office in Canada in what the streaming giant calls “a big first step” toward content creation in this country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Netflix *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Netflix plans to open an office in Canada and grow its relationship with its creators

Netflix has 21 offices around the world, including Amsterdam and Rome

Netflix co-CEO and chief content officer Ted Sarandos poses in this undated handout photo. Netflix plans to open an office in Canada in what the streaming giant calls “a big first step” toward content creation in this country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Netflix *MANDATORY CREDIT*
Moose Hide Campaign co-founders Paul Lacerte and his daughter Raven Lacerte are photographed in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, February 10, 2021. The Moose Hide Campaign to end violence against women and children has grown from a grassroots movement to reaching millions of people in more than 2,000 communities across Canada. But with the pandemic creating more isolation, the Lacertes say the problem they are trying to address remains, making the campaign just as relevant on its 10th anniversary. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Pandemic exacerbating issues at core of Moose Hide Campaign to end violence

The idea for the campaign came to Paul and Raven while they were hunting in their traditional territory

Moose Hide Campaign co-founders Paul Lacerte and his daughter Raven Lacerte are photographed in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, February 10, 2021. The Moose Hide Campaign to end violence against women and children has grown from a grassroots movement to reaching millions of people in more than 2,000 communities across Canada. But with the pandemic creating more isolation, the Lacertes say the problem they are trying to address remains, making the campaign just as relevant on its 10th anniversary. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Amanda Parsons, a registered nurse on staff at the Northwood Care facility, prepares a dose of the Moderna vaccine in Halifax on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. Almost two in three Canadians surveyed recently said they trust COVID-19 vaccines to be both safe and effective. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

New survey on trust suggests most Canadians believe COVID-19 vaccines safe, effective

Canada has approved two vaccines so far, one from Pfizer-BioNTech and a second from Moderna

Amanda Parsons, a registered nurse on staff at the Northwood Care facility, prepares a dose of the Moderna vaccine in Halifax on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. Almost two in three Canadians surveyed recently said they trust COVID-19 vaccines to be both safe and effective. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, India on February 23, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

India will ‘do its best’ to get COVID-19 vaccines to Canada, says PM Narendra Modi

Canada is not among 25 countries cleared by Indian government to receive doses of AstraZeneca’s vaccine

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, India on February 23, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks outside Rideau Cottage on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. Trudeau says the federal government will provide nearly $15 billion for public-transit projects across the country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Feds promise billions in new funds to build, expand public-transit systems

The money promised on Wednesday is intended for new systems and expansions

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks outside Rideau Cottage on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. Trudeau says the federal government will provide nearly $15 billion for public-transit projects across the country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
A COVID-19 vaccine is administered in Toronto on Monday, Dec. 14, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Clinical trials start for Canadian COVID-19 vaccine candidate

Dubbed COVAC-2, the vaccine hopeful was developed by the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization

A COVID-19 vaccine is administered in Toronto on Monday, Dec. 14, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 file photo, a state legislator adjusts her face masks while asking a question at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. A government study released on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, finds that wearing two masks can better than one, in protecting against coronavirus infection. But health officials are stopping short of recommending that everyone double-up. “The first challenge is to get as many as people as possible masking. And then for those that do mask, to help them get the best benefit out of that mask,” said Dr. John Brooks of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

U.S. CDC study finds two masks are better than one vs. COVID-19

When both exhaling and inhaling heads were double-masked, more than 95% of the particles were blocked

FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 file photo, a state legislator adjusts her face masks while asking a question at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. A government study released on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, finds that wearing two masks can better than one, in protecting against coronavirus infection. But health officials are stopping short of recommending that everyone double-up. “The first challenge is to get as many as people as possible masking. And then for those that do mask, to help them get the best benefit out of that mask,” said Dr. John Brooks of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
In this Nov. 30, 2014 image made from video released by Loujain al-Hathloul, al-Hathloul drives towards the United Arab Emirates - Saudi Arabia border before her arrest on Dec. 1 in Saudi Arabia. Al-Hathloul, one of Saudi Arabia’s most prominent women’s rights activists, who pushed for the right to drive, was sentenced on Monday, Dec. 28, 2020, to nearly six years in prison under a vague and broadly-worded law aimed at combating terrorism, according to state-linked media. Her case and imprisonment for the past two and a half years have drawn criticism from rights groups, members of the U.S. Congress and European Union lawmakers. (Loujain al-Hathloul)

UBC grad and prominent Saudi women’s rights activist released from prison

The 31-year-old Saudi activist long has been outspoken about human rights in Saudi Arabia

In this Nov. 30, 2014 image made from video released by Loujain al-Hathloul, al-Hathloul drives towards the United Arab Emirates - Saudi Arabia border before her arrest on Dec. 1 in Saudi Arabia. Al-Hathloul, one of Saudi Arabia’s most prominent women’s rights activists, who pushed for the right to drive, was sentenced on Monday, Dec. 28, 2020, to nearly six years in prison under a vague and broadly-worded law aimed at combating terrorism, according to state-linked media. Her case and imprisonment for the past two and a half years have drawn criticism from rights groups, members of the U.S. Congress and European Union lawmakers. (Loujain al-Hathloul)
The Senate of Canada building and Senate Chamber are pictured in Ottawa on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. Senators voted Tuesday to give the federal government 18 months to expand access to medical assistance in dying to people suffering solely from mental illnesses. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Senators amend assisted dying bill to put 18-month time limit on mental illness exclusion

Canadian Psychiatric Association has denounced the exclusion as discriminatory, stigmatizing

The Senate of Canada building and Senate Chamber are pictured in Ottawa on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. Senators voted Tuesday to give the federal government 18 months to expand access to medical assistance in dying to people suffering solely from mental illnesses. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Threat from variants means provinces must be ready to lock down again quickly: Tam

The number of cases linked to any of the variants doubled in the last week

A vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Krystal Abotossaway, TD Bank Group’s senior manager of diversity and inclusion, poses for a photograph in Toronto’s financial district on Monday, February 8, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

60% of Indigenous workers feel emotionally unsafe on the job: Catalyst survey

Only four in 10 Indigenous workers feel safe enough in the workplace to make mistakes

Krystal Abotossaway, TD Bank Group’s senior manager of diversity and inclusion, poses for a photograph in Toronto’s financial district on Monday, February 8, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin
Gantry cranes used to load and unload container ships at the DP World terminal at port, in Vancouver, on Monday, December 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

10,000 B.C. longshoremen, warehouse workers to receive anti-harassment training

Campaign seeks to change a work culture divided along racial lines since the late 1800s: union president

Gantry cranes used to load and unload container ships at the DP World terminal at port, in Vancouver, on Monday, December 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A police officer leaves the crime scene Feb. 8, 2021, in Montreal, where a 15-year-old girl was killed Sunday in a shooting. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Montreal drive-by shooting victim identified as 15-year-old local student

Police said the girl was with another person inside a stopped car Sunday night talking to people

A police officer leaves the crime scene Feb. 8, 2021, in Montreal, where a 15-year-old girl was killed Sunday in a shooting. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
CSIS director David Vigneault, the head of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, warns that China is undermining Canada through its efforts to steal valuable technology. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Spy chief says China undermining Canada through cyberespionage efforts

‘We all must strengthen our defences,’ warns head of Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)

CSIS director David Vigneault, the head of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, warns that China is undermining Canada through its efforts to steal valuable technology. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Dr. Jordan Feld, a liver specialist at UHN’s Toronto Centre for Liver Disease, poses in this recent handout photo. More than a year after COVID-19 emerged, few therapies exist and many that do are expensive, cumbersome and unproven, say experts who blame disjointed data, funding and communication as factors derailing efforts to tamp down disease. While warp speed efforts to develop vaccines have produced several promising options in mere months, there’s been comparatively little push for treatment tools to cut severe cases and deaths that are crippling health-care systems, says COVID-19 researcher Dr. Feld. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - University Health Network

Experts say race for COVID drugs dogged by false promises, lack of co-ordination

Urgency for effective drugs has only become more intense amid Canada’s vaccine deployment debacle

Dr. Jordan Feld, a liver specialist at UHN’s Toronto Centre for Liver Disease, poses in this recent handout photo. More than a year after COVID-19 emerged, few therapies exist and many that do are expensive, cumbersome and unproven, say experts who blame disjointed data, funding and communication as factors derailing efforts to tamp down disease. While warp speed efforts to develop vaccines have produced several promising options in mere months, there’s been comparatively little push for treatment tools to cut severe cases and deaths that are crippling health-care systems, says COVID-19 researcher Dr. Feld. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - University Health Network
Peter Ben Embarek, of the World Health Organization team holds up a chart showing pathways of transmission of the virus during a joint press conference held at the end of the WHO mission in Wuhan, China, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

WHO says COVID-19 unlikely to have leaked from lab in China

The coronavirus most likely first appeared in humans after jumping from an animal

Peter Ben Embarek, of the World Health Organization team holds up a chart showing pathways of transmission of the virus during a joint press conference held at the end of the WHO mission in Wuhan, China, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
Green party Leader Annamie Paul comments on the government’s climate legislation during a news conference in Ottawa, Thursday, November 19, 2020. Paul says Canada should support moving the 2022 Winter Olympics outside China citing a “genocidal campaign” by the state against Uighur Muslim minority. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Canada should consider hosting 2022 Winter Olympics, says Green Leader Annamie Paul

Parliamentary subcommittee concluded that China’s treatment of Uighurs does amount to genocide

Green party Leader Annamie Paul comments on the government’s climate legislation during a news conference in Ottawa, Thursday, November 19, 2020. Paul says Canada should support moving the 2022 Winter Olympics outside China citing a “genocidal campaign” by the state against Uighur Muslim minority. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld