photo:contributed

photo:contributed

The Tea Party lives on

The Canadian rock band will come to Kelowna in Spring

One of the great rock’n’roll bands to come out of Canada doesn’t plan on slowing down anytime soon.

The Tea Party was founded in 1990 and received seven of their 13 JUNO Award nominations between 1994 and 1988. The band has stayed together longer than their idols, Led Zeppelin and The Beatles.

Their unmistakable guitar riffs infused with middle eastern, celtic and mediterranean music sets them apart from the rest. Their willingness to stand out from the rest offered rewards and now the band is revered internationally.

As their career has continued, they have grown in popularity internationally. Becoming well known and in-demand in Australia and the U.S.

In the beginning of their career lead singer, Jeff Martin was constantly compared to the likes of the Doors’ frontman, Jim Morrison but they have forged their own path and cemented their mark on rock history.

“We have always stayed true to who we are, never followed trends even when everyone was either doing the grunge thing or doing nothing,” said drummer, Jeff Burrows.

The band took a break in 2005 but couldn’t quit each other and reunited in 2011.

“When we fell out and we were the complete opposite of that time — that was Canada rock’s heyday. None of it really had to do with the grunge scene. We always stayed true to our roots and realized we have always been very eclectic and we never pigeonholed ourselves to one sound,” said Burrows. “It’s strange now… listening to these new bands (that now) all sound like (the) stuff (we were) doing 30 years ago … they are right on track and we are just doing what we do.”

RELATED: Shakey Graves brings his musical evolution to the Okanagan Valley

When The Tea Party kicks off the Black River Tour, Dec. 27 in Toronto it will have been the longest time they haven’t toured together since their six-year hiatus.

“2020 will be our 30th anniversary when a band turns 30 years-old you really don’t have that perspective until say it out loud. Look at when Zeppelin started that they were done in 1980 and it’s crazy to look at things like The Beatles, did they play for 30 years? Nowhere near. So when you look at it that way to be appreciated on a national level like we are it’s an honour and we carry that weight knowing that we are very grateful for everything afforded us and keeps us going,” said Burrows.

The drummer says that their success stems from their inability to conform to trends, allowing them to be a band that almost 30 years later isn’t touring their hits but is still touring with new albums along with a few fan favourites thrown into the line-up.

RELATED: The Arkells bring Rally Cry to Kelowna

It was when the band played with the Sydney Youth Orchestra in Australia that Burrows had chills running down his spine. They performed Requiem, a song dedicated to their manager Steve Hoffman who died of cancer with the symphony and an opera singer wove her voice through the song to a full house in 2017.

“It was mind boggling, it’s something I am most grateful for, it’s those opportunities that you look around and say I don’t belong here. It’s unreal,” said Burrows.

The eclectic hard rock band will be stopping in Kelowna May 7 at the Kelowna Community Theatre. Tickets are available at selectyourtickets.com

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@sydneyrmorton
sydney.morton@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

File photo
Princeton mayor ready to support referendum if proposal for $7 million loan gets defeated

A proposal to borrow $7 million to fix town infrastructure may well… Continue reading

Directors and alternate directors at the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen received nearly $560,000 in remuneration and expenses in 2020, according to the Statement of Financial Information. (Black Press file photo)
Almost $560,000 in remuneration for Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen board

Costs of directors and alternate directors outlined in Statement of Financial Information

(File photo)
$8M in wages for Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen staff

34 employees paid more than $75,000 in 2020

Glen Lennon now resides in a neat and fully serviced unit in the Silver Crest Retirement Home, managed by Princeton and District Community Social Services. Photo Andrea DeMeer
Princeton RCMP and social workers find new home for elderly accident victim

“I love the sun and the sun shines on my patio here. I can go out and walk around.”

Longtime SOWINS volunteer Diane Fru (far left) walks with members of her family as they Walk To End Abuse Sunday, June 13, 2021. South Okanagan Women In Needs Society (SOWINS) raised a record amount this year. (Monique Tamminga Western News)
Walk to End Abuse in South Okanagan breaks fundraising record

More than $53,000 raised so far while the pandemic has increased need for SOWINS’ services

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

Eleonore Alamillo-Laberge, 6, reads a book in Ottawa on Monday, June 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Parents will need to fight ‘COVID learning slump’ over summer: B.C. literacy experts

Parents who play an active role in educating their children this summer can reverse the slump by nearly 80%, says Dr. Janet Mort

Kelowna General Hospital. (File photo)
COVID-19 outbreak at Kelowna General Hospital declared over

Three people tested positive for the virus — two patients and one staff — one of whom died

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

The B.C. government’s vaccine booking website is busy processing second-dose appointments, with more than 76 per cent of adults having received a first dose. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations stable for Tuesday

108 new confirmed cases, 139 in hospital, 39 in intensive care

A worker, at left, tends to a customer at a cosmetics shop amid the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday, May 20, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Half of cosmetics sold in Canada, U.S. contain toxic chemicals: study

Researchers tested more than 230 commonly used cosmetics and found that 56% of foundations and eye products, 48% of lip products and 47% of mascaras contained high levels of fluorine

White Rock’s Marine Drive has been converted to one-way traffic to allow more patio space for waterfront restaurants. (Peace Arch News)
Province promotes permanent pub patios in B.C. post-pandemic plan

More than 2,000 temporary expansions from COVID-19 rules

Lake City Secondary School Williams Lake campus students Ethan Reid, from left, Brenden Higgins, Ty Oviatt, Kaleb Alphonse, Nathan Kendrick and Landon Brink with RCMP officers Const. Nicoll and Const. Stancec. (Photo submitted)
RCMP thank 6 teens for helping prevent forest fire in Williams Lake

The students came across fire in a wooded area and used the water they had to try and extinguish the flames

There is an emergency shelter near the Golden Ears peaks. (Facebook/Special to The News)
Hiker fogged in on Golden Ears, spends 2 nights

Talon Helicopters, Ridge Meadows Search and Rescue bring him home Monday

Most Read