photo:Facebook                                (from left) Kylie Miller, Eliza Enman McDaniel, Jordan Miller and Leandra Earl at the iHeartRadio Much Music Video Awards in August.

photo:Facebook (from left) Kylie Miller, Eliza Enman McDaniel, Jordan Miller and Leandra Earl at the iHeartRadio Much Music Video Awards in August.

The Beaches: rock-n-roll powerhouse

The musicians talk inspiration, growing up in the spotlight and one night stands

Rock ‘n’ roll powerhouse The Beaches are no stranger to fame.

The quartet entered the Disney scene with Done With Dolls when they were pre-teens. In Grade 9 they closed the coffin to become a grown-up rock band.

“Done With Dolls had a niche market for little kids, we were just getting into high school when it was finishing up,” said Jordan Miller, bass guitar and vocalist.

“(The transition) was a little scary in that we started making music for ourselves and would have to introduce ourselves to a whole new audience.”

Now, after growing up in the spotlight, the group has evolved into a ’70s vibe where the musicians pull inspiration from The Strokes, David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, Blondie, Oasis and Nirvana.

“All we do is take the sonics of those bands and apply it to our perspective,” said Miller.

RELATED: The Glorious Sons on finding their own sound

“It’s my voice, I get a little nervous because we are such a unicorn and there are not a lot of young women in the industry. But we are at such an advantage because we are different and no one has never done this.

“Representation is so important and the more young female bands that are started, the less taboo it will be to be a young woman in the rock industry.”

The singer says she and the band—Eliza Enman-McDaniel (drums), Leandra Earl (keys) and her sister, Kylie Miller (guitar)—think the conversation about gender in music still needs to be had.

“I think that some of the girls get frustrated that it (gender) dominates so much of the conversation, you get tired of people saying you are a girl band and not just a band. But I think it’s kind of cool to represent a gender and add a new young female voice for a genre that is so dominated by old men,” said Miller.

The band’s drum fueled rhythm matched with guitar riffs that shred through their album Late Show mixes hook-heavy ’90s with ’70s whimsical rock fuel to create a sound that is entirely their own.

Miller’s wide voice range carries fans through the ethereal rock album with ease like a fine Bordeaux wine that gets better with each note.

The band has been shot into the centre stage this year after winning the 2018 JUNO Award for Breakthrough Artist of the Year, embarking on their first international tour and opening for The Foo Fighters at Rogers Centre at Vancouver in July.

RELATED: JUNO president returns to B.C. hometown to collect award

Through their rise to fame, the band has stuck together and hasn’t lost focus of what they love— making good music.

“(Performing) That is what the greatest part of being in this band is, we are reminded that not getting any sleep and being hungover all the time with bruises all over us from lifting gear, it’s for the little moments of magic, where it’s all worth it,” said Miller.

The hit track off The Late Show, T-Shirt was based off of a one-night stand’s clumsy exit where he left behind his dress shirt after a Halloween party.

“I woke up, put it on and there was $60 and an expensive lighter in the pocket,” said Miller.

After her offer to return the shirt was denied, she became inspired by the way society treats one-night stands.

“I kept the shirt, it made me think that a lot of people are so ashamed of one-night stands and are so embarrassed that they don’t want to talk about them. But they provide a lot of insight,” said Miller. ” I used the $60 to buy a bunch of toilet paper for the band.”

The Beaches are touring with fellow Ontario band The Glorious Sons, and stopped in Kelowna Nov. 5.

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