The Arkells photo: Matt Barnes

The Arkells photo: Matt Barnes

The Arkells bring Rally Cry to Kelowna

The Arkells discuss their rise to fame

The Arkells are bringing their own brand of alt-rock to Kelowna.

The multiple JUNO Award winning band will be touring their fifth studio album, Rally Cry, an energy infused anthem rich addition to their repertoire.

“It’s all been baby steps for us, nothing feels absurd right now. It’s all part of a very gradual process. We didn’t just wake up one morning as millionaires. Everything we have now is the result of a brick-by-brick operation. I think that is something I feel good about. The house is being built on its own sturdy foundation,” said frontman Max Kerman.

Their content heavy lyrics deliver statements about the current social climate in People’s Champ and a tribute to Gordon Downie in Relentless.

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“For us writing political songs that are catchy is something that our heroes have done really well like Stevie Wonder, Johnny Cash and Bruce Springstein. They know how to do songs that have meaning and weight, but also that you could play at a party,” said Kerman.

The line from their song Relentless, “relentless, like a dog to a bone” was inspired by a conversation with Paul Langlois of the Tragically Hip about Downie and how he adored him. Langlois began talking about how relentless he was to keep on touring even after being diagnosed with cancer. Langlois called Downie relentless for his dedication to touring and to performing like a dog to a bone. His sentence then became their chorus.

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The Arkells achieved international recognition after forming in 2006 and adopting a street name from their hometown Hamilton, Ontario, Arkell Street. In 2008 they released their debut album, Jackson Square. Now they have played sold out shows, 2017 World Series, NHL Awards, Stanley Cup Playoffs, U.S. Open, Coachella, Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, and had a song featured in the 2018 Super Bowl.

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“It’s a pretty awesome feeling to think that a song you wrote in your bedroom can be heard and felt by people thousands of kilometres away from you,” said Kerman. “You definitely get a real hit of gratification when you are performing a song and they are singing it right back at you. It’s that feeling of community and being a part of something big.”

The hard working band still loves stepping onto the stage after more than ten years together and will be kicking off their Rally Cry Tour in Edmonton Jan. 31 and will be stopping in Kelowna Feb. 5 at Prospera Place at 7:30 p.m. with Lord Huron. Tickets are available at selectyourtickets.com

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