Ticks spotted in Princeton

How to keep yourself safe this spring from ticks.

Ticks have been spotted around Princeton.

Spring is here and many of us will be spending more time outdoors in tall grass and wooded areas which means an increased chance of getting tick bites.

Ticks, small bugs that bite and feed on the blood of humans and animals, can sometimes transmit disease.

Fortunately, there are precautions people can take to prevent illnesses that may be transmitted from tick bites.

“There are easy things you can do to protect yourself like covering up before you head outdoors and  checking for ticks when returning from a walk, hike or bike ride,” said Dr. Karin Goodison, Public Health Physician with Interior Health.

“Most tick bites do not result in illness; however, any bite from a tick or other insect should be cleaned because infection can occur whenever there is a break in the skin.”

While ticks are common in the Interior Health region, most are the wood tick species which do not carry the Lyme disease bacteria.

Lyme disease-carrying ticks are more common in the coastal areas of B.C. The wood tick can carry other diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, although it is rare.

In addition, ticks also have toxins that can cause temporary muscle weakness and paralysis if they are attached for several days, especially in children or seniors – but the symptoms fade once the tick is removed from the skin.

The signs of many tick-borne infections can be quite similar and include fever, headache, muscle pain and rash.

“Lyme disease-carrying ticks are less common in the Interior of B.C. than on the coast; however, our residents do travel around the province, so it’s important they are aware of the signs of Lyme disease,” said Goodison.

“Approximately 70 to 80 per cent of people newly infected with Lyme disease will develop small red bumps at the site of the tick bite within several days. The redness then spreads out into a  circular rash eventually resembling a target or “bull’s-eye”.

People who experience this rash should see their doctor as soon as possible.”

Reducing the risk

One of the most important ways to reduce the risk of tick illnesses is to do a skin check on yourself and your children after being outdoors. Other precautions include:

– Walking on cleared trails when in tall grass or wooded areas.

– Wearing a hat, long sleeves, pants and light-coloured clothing.

– Tucking pant legs into socks or boots.

– Applying insect repellent containing DEET on uncovered skin.

– Carefully checking clothing and scalp (covered or not) when leaving an area where ticks may live.

– Regularly checking household pets for ticks.

Keep ticks away

To reduce ticks from entering your home and yard, try these steps:

– Keep your lawn short and remove any leaf litter and weeds.

– Keep a buffer area such as wood-chip or gravel border between your lawn and wooded areas or stone walls. Any play equipment or play zones should be kept away from wooded areas.

– Trim tree branches to allow more sunlight in your yard.

– Keep wood piles and bird feeders away from the house.

– Widen and maintain trails on your property.

How to get ticks out

If you find a tick on yourself, a family member or pet, wear gloves when removing it and be careful not to crush the tick as this could cause it to inject its stomach contents into your skin.

Other tips to remove ticks safely include:

– Use needle-nose tweezers to gently grasp the tick close to the skin.

– Without squeezing, pull the tick straight out.

– After removal, clean the area with soap and water.

– If you find a tick, check very carefully for others.

If you have concerns or need assistance removing a tick, please contact your family doctor or visit a walk-in medical clinic.

 

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