Summerland’s fallen soldiers and nurses are displayed on banners displayed around the community prior to Remembrance Day. (Contributed)

Summerland’s fallen soldiers and nurses are displayed on banners displayed around the community prior to Remembrance Day. (Contributed)

Remembrance banners depict Summerland’s fallen soldiers

Efforts to create banners began in 2000

By Paul Randall

Banners with information about Summerland’s fallen soldiers will be displayed around the community prior to Remembrance Day, Nov. 11.

The importance of knowing fallen soldiers is what lead former Summerland councillors David Gregory and David Finnis to come up with the Remembrance Banner project.

They discussed this at an informal Summerland municipal council meeting in 2000. Each fallen soldier or nurse would be commemorated with a banner with his or her photograph to be displayed around town during the week of Remembrance Day.

Researching the lives of the fallen from the First and Second World War began with help from Sherril Foster, then curator and administrator of the Summerland Museum.

READ ALSO: Summerland displays banners for Remembrance Day

READ ALSO: Remembrance Day to be held by video: Summerland Legion

In 2007, Summerland Remembers, by David Gregory and Sherril Foster was published despite errors, hoping the community would come forth with additional information. They received some feedback from several individuals.

Gregory’s next task was tracking down photographs of the fallen and fundraising for these banners. It was a slow process trying to track down descendants and extensive online searches for photographs.

Several individuals and businesses purchased a banner. The banners, measuring 61 by 153 centimetres.

In 2012, the first banners funded by local residents were displayed in early November. This was followed in 2015 with 10 banners, funded by Ken Dunsdon and by 2016, there were 57 banners displayed.

In 2018, Summerland Credit Union, an early sponsor, agreed to fund 16 more banners over the next two years. From this time on, banners would be of a soldier’s silhouette unless a photograph was found.

In 2019, the remaining eight banners with silhouettes were added.

This left two more First World War soldiers without banners, A. Bridgeman and E. Johnson. Researchers have not identified Bridgeman, and Johnston survived the war.

Banners for another 33 fallen soldiers from both wars who are not named on the cenotaph are being considered.

This location to display the banners was determined by David Hill because of his extensive historical knowledge of pioneer families.

He based the location on where the person or the family lived, worked or played.

Hill wanted these street banners, hung on lamp standards to be centrally located so that they will be visible to all around the week of Remembrance Day.

At the end of 2019, the Summerland Legion stepped up when a new storage location for these banners was needed.

Legion member John Dorn chose to display each banner for a month, by the entrance to the Legion. This was accompanied by a concise researched soldier biography so everyone can get to know the soldier better.

So far the story of George Dale (1897-1918), Olive Millicent de Satge de Thoren (1876-1917) (only woman on the cenotaph), Tremlett Foster Knox (1879-1916) and Laurence Hickey (1919-1944) has been displayed.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Remembrance Day

Just Posted

This undated file photo provided by Ernie Carswell & Partners shows the home featured in the opening and closing scenes of The Brady Bunch in Los Angeles. Do you know the occupation of Mike Brady, the father in this show about a blended family? (Anthony Barcelo/Ernie Carswell & Partners via AP, File)
QUIZ: A celebration of dad on Father’s Day

How much do you know about famous fathers?

Fruit farmers in the Okanagan and Creston valleys are in desperate need of cherry harvesters amid COVID-19 work shortages. (Photo: Unsplash/Abigail Miller)
‘Desperate’ need for workers at Okanagan cherry farms

Fruit farmers are worried they’ll have to abandon crops due to COVID-19 work shortages

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Over 5K jabbed at Interior Health mobile COVID-19 vaccine clinics

The clinics have made stops in more than 40 communities since launching last week

Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talks about B.C.’s plan to restart the province during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, May 25, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Interior Health COVID-19 cases falling slower than the rest of B.C.

More than a third of provincial cases announced Thursday came from the Interior

The Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce will host the Valley Wide Business Expo May 4 at Predator Ridge Resort. (photo submitted)
Golf raffle helps Okanagan families score homes

Habitat for Humanity Okanagan swinging into action this summer with a new raffle

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

Gord with a mom and her young son outside Pathways which was defunded on May 31. (Facebook)
Gord Portman with a mom and her child outside of Pathways. The sign says it all about the difference Pathways has made in people’s lives. They were defunded by Interior Health on May 31.
Penticton man takes the plunge for the recovery house that helped save his life

Gord Portman said Discovery House and Pathways have been everything in his 1 year sobriety

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
Fort St. John man arrested after allegedly inviting sexual touching from children

Two children reported the incident to a trusted adult right away

Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose behind vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines on the counter, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. An independent vaccine tracker website founded by a University of Saskatchewan student says just over 20 per cent of eligible Canadians — those 12 years old and above — are now fully vaccinated. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
At least 20% of eligible Canadians fully vaccinated, 75% with one dose: data

Earlier projections for reopening at this milestone didn’t include Delta variant

Emily Steele holds up a collage of her son, 16-year-old Elijah-Iain Beauregard who was stabbed and killed in June 2019, outside of Kelowna Law Courts on June 18. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
Kelowna woman who fatally stabbed Eli Beauregard facing up to 1.5 years of jail time

Her jail sentence would be followed by an additional one to 1.5 years of supervision

Cpl. Scott MacLeod and Police Service Dog Jago. Jago was killed in the line of duty on Thursday, June 17. (RCMP)
Abbotsford police, RCMP grieve 4-year-old service dog killed in line of duty

Jago killed by armed suspect during ‘high-risk’ incident in Alberta

The George Road wildfire near Lytton, B.C., has grown to 250 hectares. (BC Wildfire Service)
B.C. drone sighting halts helicopters fighting 250 hectares of wildfire

‘If a drone collides with firefighting aircraft the consequences could be deadly,’ says BC Wildfire Service

A dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a vaccination site in Vancouver Thursday, March 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
NACI advice to mix vaccines gets varied reaction from AstraZeneca double-dosers

NACI recommends an mRNA vaccine for all Canadians receiving a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

A aerial view shows the debris going into Quesnel Lake caused by a tailings pond breach near the town of Likely, B.C., Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Updated tailings code after Mount Polley an improvement: B.C. mines auditor

British Columbia’s chief auditor of mines has found changes to the province’s requirements for tailings storage facilities

Most Read