Okanagan man rides the rail trail in support of Alzheimer’s

Okanagan man rides the rail trail in support of Alzheimer’s

Kelowna to Vernon and back as part of the online Walk for Alzheimer’s May 31

Efforts are gearing up to move online for, for the first time ever, for the IG Wealth Management Walk for Alzheimer’s.

The annual event which traditionally takes place in communities across B.C. is moving online Sunday, May 31. And one Okanagan resident is doing what he can to keep the tradition moving.

Pearse Walsh, volunteer co-chair of the Kelowna event, is raising funds by changing his personal strategy.

“I plan on cycling the length of the Okanagan Rail Trail from Kelowna to Vernon and back in one day, a distance of 100 kms,” said Walsh, who is asking friends to sponsor him.

And so far efforts such as Walsh’s and others are making a difference, with nearly $20,000 raised in Kelowna.

“Together, we can support people affected by dementia during these unprecedented times and ensure that physical distancing does not result in social isolation,” said Alzheimer Society of B.C. CEO Maria Howard.

“Staying socially connected is beneficial to brain health, and it is crucial to keeping our spirits high. This is a real opportunity to show we are a country united to support people affected by dementia, and that, together, we make memories matter.”

The online event will start at 9 a.m. PDT on May 31 and can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection. Participants will be able to stream the Walk live, while joining in the fun from their living room, back yard or balcony. The broadcast will feature participants from all across Canada who will share their personal stories of how dementia has affected their life, as well as competing in fun challenges and walking in a safe space.

Sign up at walkforalzheimers.ca to represent your local community and access updates about the online Walk experience. Funds raised will help fund programs and services to support people living with dementia in your local community. They will also help enable research into the causes of and cure for dementia.

“While COVID-19 has changed many ways we are currently living and interacting, one thing remains: the Canadian spirit of togetherness,” the Alzheimer Society states. “We hope you will join us to show that no matter what the world looks like, we are still united to support people affected by dementia.”

READ MORE: Long distance Alzheimer’s care strategies offered in North Okanagan

READ MORE: Brain Awareness Week lights up the importance of challenging the brain


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