Pacific Rim National Park on the west coast of Vancouver Island is an internationally famous destination. The park has reopened, but travel to the region is still restricted. (Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News)

Cross-Canada group calls for reopening of travel, tourism

B.C.’s summer restart still faces COVID-19 obstacles

“It’s time our governments allow Canadians to travel freely,” says an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and all premiers as the B.C. government prepares to lift its in-province advisory to stick to essential travel only in the COVID-19 pandemic.

The letter is signed by a business and tourism leaders across the country, including Greg D’Avignon, CEO of the Business Council of B.C., Perrin Beatty, president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, hotel owners and airport executives from Halifax to Prince George. It urges a return to not just travel within Canada but internationally as well.

The letter notes that Australia, Germany, France and Italy have started to reopen borders with countries deemed safe.

“The mandatory 14-day quarantine and complete closure to all visitors from abroad is no longer necessary and is out of step with other countries around the globe,” the letter states. “Not all countries and regions are risky, and we shouldn’t treat them as such.”

The open letter is the latest of a series of distress signals sent by tourist-dependent businesses as summer approaches and many operators fear they won’t survive the pandemic restrictions. B.C. Premier John Horgan has indicated the province is preparing to lift a travel advisory that features highway signs advising “essential travel only.”

RELATED: B.C. on track for in-province travel, Horgan says

RELATED: Temperature checks coming at Canadian airports

Horgan and B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix have repeatedly indicated in recent days that they consider U.S. travel to be a non-starter at this stage, with coronavirus infections on the rise in Washington, Oregon, California and Arizona.

Horgan and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry have also signalled that B.C.’s low infection rate means travel within the province will soon be promoted via a Destination B.C. marketing campaign.

Henry has stressed that non-essential travel is up to local authorities, including Indigenous communities that have indicated they don’t want infection risk from visitors to remote locations such as Haida Gwaii.

The Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council voted unanimously June 9 to impose strict conditions on their traditional territory along 300 km of the west coast of Vancouver Island. They include availability of coronavirus testing for residents and screening and 14-day self-isolation of non-residents before travel.

“Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council strongly opposes the opening of the Canada border for duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and until Nuu-chah-nulth leaders advise otherwise,” President Judith Sayers said.

Another issue for tourism operators struggling to restart is the reluctance of employees to return to work, with many collecting up to $2,000 a month from the Canada Emergency Response Benefit. In its June 10 bulletin to members, the Tourism Industry Association of B.C. offers human resources advice to recall employees.

The association also reports that only one in four of its member businesses see themselves as able to restart without B.C. moving to phase three of its reopening plan. That could come as early as mid-June.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislatureCoronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Windows broken, racist graffiti left on Summerland home

Family says nothing like this has happened since they moved to Summerland in 1980s

Oliver cherry farm allowed to continue operating following positive COVID-19 cases

Interior Health not concerned about health risk to individuals consuming products from farm

Morning Start: Big Bertha is the oldest cow to ever live

Your morning start for Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Two positive COVID-19 cases at Oliver farm

The risk of exposure to the general public related to this farm is considered to be low

Oliver Town Hall closed to public as staffer shows COVID-19 symptoms

One staff member at Oliver Town Hall is being tested for coronavirus

Sources say Canada, U.S. likely to extend mutual travel ban into late August

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hinted at the possibility after a phone call with U.S. President

B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’ charged with sex assault of teenage boys

The man, 75, is accused of assaulting teenage boys he met through Coquitlam-area churches

B.C.’s potential deficit $12.5 billion as spending spikes, taxes drop

Finance Minister Carole James gives COVID-19 outlook

Rare comet NEOWISE and aurora lights captured in Okanagan

The image was captured over Big Horn Lake near Kelowna with a Pixel 4XL android phone

‘We know people are going to come to Kelowna’: Mayor addresses COVID-19 cluster

The mayor said people need to continue following the advice of the medical health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry

City of Kelowna to hold funds for 2023 Memorial Cup bid

$135,000 of the city’s initial $225,000 commitment to the tournament will be held for a future bid

Vernon Search and Rescue aids injured Okanagan Rail Trail cyclist

Group’s Utility Terrain Vehicle proving to be a valuable asset on the popular trail

Hitchhiker with metal pipe prompts RCMP to close of Highway 1 near Salmon Arm

Police respond to report of man who pointed what was believed to be a rifle at passing driver

Canadians torn on scaling back COVID-19 benefits to save money: poll

Of those surveyed, 78 per cent said they were worried about the size of the deficit

Most Read