B.C. tightens rules for care of dairy cattle

National standards adopted after last year's revelations of abuse by employees at a Chilliwack dairy farm

No charges have been laid after a video surfaced last year of abuse of animals at Chilliwack Cattle Sales

The B.C. government is adopting national standards for care of dairy cattle, a measure called for by the SPCA after a video surfaced showing abuse of cows last year at a Chilliwack farm.

The National Dairy Code of Practice covers shelter, feed and water as well as veterinary care and handling practices. It prohibits electric prods, hitting, kicking and shouting when handling cattle.

The code also demands that dairy farms recognize the companionship needs of cattle, and that their barns need adequate lighting and non-slip floors.

Eight employees of Chilliwack Cattle Sales, Canada’s largest dairy farm, were fired last June after a video showed them beating cows with sticks, chains and rakes. The B.C. Milk Marketing Board lifted its ban on milk purchases from the farm after inspecting its operation and imposing monitoring on it.

Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick announced the adoption of the code at the Cloverdale SPCA shelter Wednesday. He said the specific standards will help industry regulators and judges determine if cruelty to animals has been committed.

The SPCA recommended charges of wilfully causing “unnecessary pain, suffering and injury to animals” against the former Chilliwack employees, but Crown prosecutors have not yet decided on whether to proceed.

Marcie Moriarty, chief prevention and enforcement officer of the B.C. SPCA, praised the adoption of the new code.

“We can’t change the past but we can change the present and affect the future,” Moriarty said. “Hopefully we won’t ever see a repeat of what happened last year.”

The B.C. SPCA receives an average of 8,800 cruelty complaints a year. About a quarter of those involve farm animals, but most of those involve treatment of horses. Moriarty said complaints about dairy farms are rare.

Dave Eto, CEO of the B.C. Dairy Association, said he welcomes whistleblowers such as the employee who captured video of the abuse in Chilliwack.

“It’s somewhat self-destructive for a farmer to want to have animal abuse, especially for dairy cows,” Eto said. “an unhappy cow does not produce milk.”

 

Just Posted

Ninety-one-year-old Princeton woman votes from the cab of a Ford F-150

Angela Maynard was only ten years old when women in Canada were… Continue reading

Town taps emergency funds to repair museum roof

The municipality is tapping emergency funds to repair the roof of the… Continue reading

Many memories tied to Princeton’s founding family

Art Martens livingsignificantly.ca When four Elders from the Lower Similkameen Indian Band… Continue reading

Grey, damp, warm week ahead in Okanagan, Shuswap, Columbia

Environment Canada calling for clouds and showers, and warm temperatures, throughout the area

Princeton woman honored for helping make town inclusive

“I believe everyone should be included and supported and able to contribute.”… Continue reading

Election 2019: Robert Mellalieu — Green Party candidate for Central Okanagan-Similkameen-Nicola

Robert Mellalieu is running for the Green Party in Central Okanagan-Similkameen-Nicola

BC Ferries sees steady traffic of post-Thanksgiving weekend travellers

Ferries filling up fast, sailing waits at some terminals

‘Save the kids!’ Dorian survivor tells the harrowing story of his Canadian wife’s death

Family held a funeral and placed Alishia Liolli’s remains in a niche at a cemetery in Windsor, Ont.

Heiltsuk Nation open first Big House in 120 years in northern B.C.

Opening means the community now has an appropriate space for spiritual and ceremonial events

Singh says NDP would form coalition with the Liberals to stop Tories

Singh was in a Liberal-held riding Sunday afternoon in Surrey where he was pressed about his post-election intentions

‘My heart goes out to the mother’: B.C. dad reacts to stabbing death of Ontario boy

Carson Crimeni, who was also 14, was bullied relentlessly, his dad says

BC Ferries filling up fast with post-Thanksgiving weekend travellers

Monday anticipated to be busiest day of the weekend

Morning Start: How old is the Canadian Thanksgiving tradition?

Your morning start for Monday, October 14th, 2019

‘Wham-bam out the door’: Surrey man’s front yard left ruined by scamming landscaper

Resident warns neighbours to be careful of door-to-door salesmen

Most Read